hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 136 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 27 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 26 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 25 5 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) or search for Donaldsonville (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
of Baton Rouge, La. effect of the destruction of the ram Arkansas. Confederates attack Baton Rouge and are repulsed. honor to whom honor is due. attack on Donaldsonville. fight with the Confederate iron-clad cotton. capture of the A. B. Seger. ascending the Louisiana bayous. Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. dea and unarmed vessels had been practiced with impunity, and Farragut determined to repress it if possible. He had sent messengers several times to the town of Donaldsonville, to inform the authorities that, unless steps were taken to stop this useless and inhuman practice, the town would be held responsible. When passing up the river to the support of Baton Rouge, he anchored the Hartford two miles above Donaldsonville and heard them firing on vessels ascending the river (the transport, Sallie Robinson and the steamer Brooklyn), in the latter case, the enemy getting more than they bargained for and being driven to cover. The next night they fired upon
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
operations against that place. attack on Donaldsonville by Confederate General Green. his retreatations had been made by this party against Donaldsonville, but they were driven off by the fire of tyal, Commander M. B. Woolsey) stationed at Donaldsonville, the place the enemy was marching to attaceral Green and his army retreated and left Donaldsonville in peace. One hundred and twenty of the Crender of that place. On his arrival at Donaldsonville, Lieutenant-Commander Perkins was directed and down the river and messengers sent to Donaldsonville to state the condition of affairs, and alsnongahela. The messengers returned from Donaldsonville, stating that no assistance could be rendet from the Princess Royal when the post at Donaldsonville was attacked by General Green, who with hiat. But General Weitzel was in command at Donaldsonville and he did not seem to think a gun-boat of passing the batteries, twelve miles below Donaldsonville, and Farragut says of him: Commander Reed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
hfulness and energy of the American naval officers, who were ever on the alert, and would either run the blockade-runners off the coast or upon the beach, where they would fall into Federal hands, often with their cargoes in perfect order. This was the case with the Princess Royal, which was floated off without sustaining the least injury, and was fitted up by the Navy Department as a gun-boat. and performed good service, under Commander M. B. Woolsey, at the capture of the forts at Donaldsonville, La. During January, 1863, the harbor of Charleston was not occupied by the Federal squadron, but the vessels lay outside the bar, keeping a bright look-out. Towards the end of the month two of the heaviest ships. the Powhatan and Canandaigua, had to proceed to Port Royal for coal, leaving some lighter vessels to continue the blockade. The Confederates had two ironclad rams, the Chicora and Palmetto State, under Commodore D. N. Ingraham, in Charleston Harbor, and on the 31st of Janua