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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Harrisonburg, La. (Louisiana, United States) or search for Harrisonburg, La. (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
fiercely contested. the Benton's wheel disabled. damages to the vessels. the gun-boats tie up at hard times. burying the dead. the attack renewed. the Confederates stand to their guns. so-called history. Grant's brightest chapter. attack on Haines' Bluff. Captain Walke captures sharpshooters. Grand Gulf captured. Porter confers with Farragut. up the Red River. Fort Derussy partially destroyed. capture of Alexandria. General Banks takes possession up the Black River. Harrisonburg shelled. operations of the Mississippi squadron summarized. The Army had already moved on the 15th of April, 1863, and that night was selected for the naval vessels to pass the batteries of Vicksburg. Orders had been given that the coal in the furnaces should be well ignited, so as to show no smoke, that low steam should be carried, that not a wheel was to turn except to keep the vessel's bow down river, and to drift past the enemy's works fifty yards apart. Most of the vessels
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
ime captured the steamer Elmira, loaded with stores for the Confederate army under General Walker, who on hearing of the arrival of the Federal gun-boats embarked his army and disappeared up some of the tortuous channels known only to pilots. Selfridge started in pursuit and soon overtook two of the transports, but the Confederates immediately abandoned the vessels after setting them on fire, and they were totally destroyed. One steamer loaded with ammunition escaped above the fort at Harrisonburg, a strong work impregnable to wooden gun-boats with light batteries. The expedition could proceed no further in this direction. Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge fortunately learned of a large amount of ammunition that had been sent up from Natchez, whence large quantities of provisions, stores and ammunition were often transported. Natchez took no part in the war beyond making money by supplying the Confederate armies. Selfridge captured at one place fifteen thousand rounds of smoot
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
rates out of Waterproof. important services rendered by tin-clads. expedition up Black and Washita Rivers. gun-boats drive Confederates out of Trinity and Harrisonburg. heroic seamen. Plot to blow up fleet. Confederate secret service. letters of Confederate Secretary of the Navy and others. names of persons in Confederatapnel bursting in all directions and tearing the village almost to pieces. On the following day the expedition proceeded up the river to within two miles of Harrisonburg, where it was again attacked by General Polignac, with a large number of sharp-shooters and some 12-pound rifleguns, from behind the levee. The fire of the guarly reaching Monroe, but was obliged to return owing to the rapidly falling water — not, however, until the object of the expedition had been accomplished. Harrisonburg had always been a troublesome place, from which constant expeditions were fitted out to raid along the Mississippi. The approaches to it had been strongly for