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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 4, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 20, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Pointe Coupee (La.) (Louisiana, United States) or search for Pointe Coupee (La.) (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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ndall was born in Baltimore the first day of 1839. His early schooling was under Joseph H. Clark, a former teacher of Edgar Allan Poe. At Georgetown College he was the smallest boy that had ever been received as a student. After becoming known as the poet of the college, he traveled extensively in the West Indies and South America, landing in 1858 in New Orleans on his return. Then he accepted the chair of English literature at Poydras College, a flourishing Creole institution at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana. He was still teaching there when he learned through the New Orleans Delta of the attack on the Sixth Massachusetts in Baltimore on April 19, 1861. That night he wrote the verses that ran like wildfire through the South and were parodied numberless times in the North. The remainder of his days were chiefly spent in newspaper work, largely in Georgia. He became indifferent to his poetical work, and it was owing to the insistence of his friend, Miss Lillian McGregor Shepherd, that
ege he became acquainted with Mr. D. C. Jenkins, editor of the New Orleans Delta, who published some of his verse. In April, 1861, he sent the young Professor a copy of the poems of James Clarence Mangan. Randall was warm in his admiration of the gifted Irish poet, and especially enthusiastic about that passionate outburst, the Karamanian Exile. one stanza begins: I see thee ever in my dreams, Karaman! thy hundred hills, thy thousand streams, Karaman, O Karaman! his dreamy existence at Pointe Coupee was rudely broken on April 23, 1861, by the news in the New Orleans Delta of the attack on the troops of the Sixth Massachusetts as they passed through Baltimore on April 19th. The first citizen to fall was a friend and College mate of the poet. Randall's own account of the effect of this news appears in a letter printed in Professor Brander Matthews' pen and Ink: this account excited me greatly. I had long been absent from my native city, and the startling event there inflamed my