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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 123 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 62 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 20 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) or search for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 45.-skirmish at Patterson's Creek. Col. Wallace's official report. (search)
Doc. 45.-skirmish at Patterson's Creek. Col. Wallace's official report. Cumberland, June 27. To General McClellan:-- I have been accustomed to sending my mounted pickets, thirteen men in all, to different posts along the several approaches to Cumberland. Finding it next to impossible to get reliable information of the enemy yesterday, I united the thirteen, and directed them, if possible, to proceed to Frankfort, a town midway between this place and Romney, to see if there were rebel Cumberland. Finding it next to impossible to get reliable information of the enemy yesterday, I united the thirteen, and directed them, if possible, to proceed to Frankfort, a town midway between this place and Romney, to see if there were rebel troops there. They went within a quarter of a mile of the place, and found it full of cavalry. Returning they overtook forty horsemen, and at once charged on them, routing and driving them back more than a mile, killing eight of them, and securing seventeen horses. Corporal Hayes, in command of my men, was desperately wounded with sabre cuts and bullets. Taking him back they halted about an hour, and were then attacked by the enemy, who were reinforced to about seventy-five men. The attack w
Doc. 57.-rebel official account of the battle at New Creek, Virginia. brigade Headquarters, camp Davis, Romney, Va., June 19, 1861. Colonel:--I have the honor to report that on yesterday I directed Colonel J. C. Vaughan, of the Third Tennessee regiment, to take two companies from his own and two from the Thirteenth Virginia regiment, and at eight o'clock P. M. to proceed to New Creek depot, eighteen miles west of Cumberland, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, disperse the forces there collected, bring away the two pieces of artillery, and burn the railroad bridge. These directions, I am happy to assure you, were carried out to the letter, and the march of thirty-eight miles accomplished between eight P. M. and twelve the next day. Some 250 of the federal troops, after a slight stand, retired in disorder, with a loss of a few men. The bridge was then burned, and Colonel Vaughan retired, bringing with him two pieces of artillery and a stand of colors. To Colonel Vaughan, h
nd more coming in constantly. I know already of ten officers killed and prisoners. Their retreat is complete. I occupied Beverly by a rapid march. Garnett abandoned his camp early in the morning, leaving much of his equipage. He came within a few miles of Beverly, but our rapid march turned him back in great confusion, and he is now retreating on the road to St. George. I have ordered Gen. Morris to follow him up closely. I have telegraphed for the two Pennsylvania regiments at Cumberland to join Gen. Hill at Rowlesburg. The General is concentrating all his troops at Rowlesburg, and he will cut off Garnett's retreat near West Union, or, if possible, at St. George. I may say that we have driven out some ten thousand troops, strongly intrenched, with the loss of 11 killed and 35 wounded. The provision returns here show Garnett's force to have been ten thousand men. They were Eastern Virginians, Tennesseans, Georgians, and, I think, Carolinians. To-morrow I can give full