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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 123 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 62 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 20 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) or search for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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A lesson to Secessionists.--A thrilling incident occurred when the secession steamer came down to Fortress Monroe with the refugees from Norfolk. There were several secessionists on board as passengers, under the flag of truce, beside the commander and officers, who were formerly in the well-paid and honorable service of the United States. Soon after she had come alongside the noble old Cumberland, Commodore Pendergrast, in full view of the Stars and Stripes on the ship and at Fortress Monroe, the State of Georgia came steaming in, with her decks, upper works, wheel-houses, and rigging covered with a fresh arrival of brave Union troops. She passed close by the Cumberland, almost jamming in the secession craft, and hiding her little flag under the shadow of the two great vessels. Then arose such cheers as patriots only can give, rolling along over the waters until they were heard far up along the ramparts of the fortress and the camps of the shore. The rigging of the Cumberla