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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 123 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 100 62 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 55 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 20 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 20 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) or search for Cumberland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

ately for us, the line of the railroad was well defended, and the enemy's cavalry being successfully attacked by Colonel McCook, at Anderson's Cross-Roads, on the second October; by General Mitchell, at Shelbyville, on the sixth; and by General Crook, at Farmington, on the eighth, were mostly captured or destroyed. Major-General Grant arrived at Louisville, and on the nineteenth, in accordance with the orders of the President, assumed general command of the Departments of the Tennessee, Cumberland, and Ohio. In accordance with his recommendation, Major-General G. W. Thomas was placed in the immediate command of the department of the Cumberland, and Major-General Sherman of that of the Tennessee. As the supply of the army at Chattanooga demanded prompt attention, he immediately repaired to that place. By bringing up from Bridgeport the Eleventh and Twelfth corps, under Hooker, and throwing a force from Chattanooga, under General W. F. Smith, on the south side of the river, at Bu
In the mean time many important changes in command had occurred, which I must note here, to a proper understanding of the case. General Grant had been called from Vicksburgh and sent to Chattanooga to command the three armies of the Ohio, Cumberland, and the Tennessee, and the department of the Termessee had been devolved on me, with instructions, however, to retain command of the army in the field. At Iuka I made what appeared to me the best disposition of matters relating to this depa lost and expended 211 stand of small arms, 171 infantry accoutrements, 1977 rounds artillery ammunition, 1,560,125 rounds infantry ammunition. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, T. G. Bagler, Captain and Chief of Ordnance Department Cumberland. Major-General Hoorer's report. headquarters Eleventh and Twelfth corps, Lookout Valley, Tenn., Feb. 4, 1864. Brigadier-General W. D. Whipple, A. A. G., Army of the Cumberland: General: I have the honor to submit the following repor
ry, in small detachments, was sent out from Harper's Ferry, Martinsburgh, and Cumberland to gain information of the enemy's whereabouts. The scouting-parties did not moving on Romney. another small force out watching from the neighborhood of Cumberland, we slowly fell back in the New-Creek valley, with a view to drawing the enemd kept from doing any great injury to the railroad by the troops stationed at Cumberland and elsewhere within easy supporting distances. This was not all the plan ofed formed for action. Scenes of lively interest ensued. In the streets of Cumberland the ladies — that is, a great many of them — promenaded up and down, of course Where are you? Where are you? shells go whizzing over the devoted city of Cumberland, and to see the coal-dust flying in all directions. I will not stop to dete garrison at Petersburgh. He has been defeated in getting into New-Creek or Cumberland, failed to interrupt the running of the railroad trains beyond a few hours, a
Doc. 103.-capture of the Cumberland. Key West, Fla., Feb. 14, 1864. For some months past an English steamer has been lying in Havana waiting for a favorable opportunity to run the blockade. Her name is the Cumberland. What added to the interest felt in this was the impression that should she succeed in getting into a rebel port with her valuable cargo, she would be fitted out as a privateer, and issue forth for the purpose of preying on our commerce, after the manner of the Alabama, Florida, and other Southern rovers. To this end, it was alleged that the Cumberland had a formidable armament on board, furnished by some accommodating British firm, of the Laird Lindsay stripe, ready to be mounted as soon as her cargo was discharged in Mobile or some other port in rebeldom. Under such circumstances, a strict watch was kept on the Cumberland, and information of her doings was from time to time transmitted from Havana to Rear-Admiral Bailey, commanding the East-Gulf squadron a