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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Shawanese (Maryland, United States) or search for Shawanese (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
gallant manner in which the enemy's flank was turned by it. On our return from Washington, McCausland with his brigade, and General Bradley Johnson's cavalry brigade, were sent to Chambersburg to retaliate for the burning Hunter and others had done in Virginia and the South. Our squadron did not actively participate in the burning of Chambersburg, but was guarding one of the approaches when it was burnt, and constituted McCausland's rear guard when he left there. McCausland captured Old Town, Md., and after making feints at Cumberland, came to Moorefield. Here the enemy surprised General Johnson, whose brigade was next to the enemy, and came in among his men at daybreak. While commanding the regiment, I ordered our squadron to charge the enemy. It did so in splendid style, and stopped the enemy at that point. Right at the ford across the South Branch of the Potomac, was the hardest of the fights, one where this squadron lost most in killed and wounded. It lost heavily in