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am of the opinion that the Virginians were fully as loyal as the Marylanders. But a large number of the soldiers when fresh and new in the service saw an enemy in every bush, and recognized no white man south of Mason and Dixon's line as other than a secesh. Very often they were right, but the point I wish to make is that they indulged in foraging to a greater extent probably than troops which had been longer in service. Before my own company had seen any hard service it was located at Poolesville, thirty-eight miles from Washington, where it formed part of an independent brigade, which was included in the defences of Washington, and under the command of General Heintzelman. While we lay there drilling, growling, and feeding on government rations, a sergeant of the guard imperilled his chevrons by leading off a midnight foraging party, after having first communicated the general countersign to the entire party. On this particular occasion a flock of sheep was the object of the ex
dings received by our army that the fighting bishop had been slain. He was hit by a shell from a volley of artillery fired by order of General Sherman. To the men in the other arms of the service, who saw this mysterious and almost continuous waving of flags, it seemed as if every motion was fraught with momentous import. What could it all be about? they would ask one another. A signal station was located, in ‘61-2, on the top of what was known as the Town Hall (since burned) in Poolesville, Md., within a few rods of my company's camp, and, to the best of my recollection, not an hour of daylight passed without more or less flag-waving from that point. This particular squad of men did not seem at all fraternal, but kept aloof, as if (so we thought) they feared they might, in an unguarded moment, impart some of the important secret information which had been received by them from the station at Sugar Loaf Mountain or Seneca. Since the war, I have learned that their apparently e
155,198, 303,356-59,378 Perryville, Md., 355 Petersburg, 57-58, 120, 159, 177, 238,286,320,350,381,393,403 Pickett, George E., 407 Pine Mountain, Ga., 404 Pittsfield, Mass., 44 Pleasant Valley, Md., 346 Poems: The Army Bean, 137-38; The Army mule in time of peace, 297; The charge of the mule brigade, 295-97; The substitute, 216; The sweet little man, 26-28; We've drank from the same canteen, 223-24 Point of Rocks, Va., 392 Polk, Leonidas, 404 Pontoons, 381-91 Poolesville, Md., 244,404 Pope, John, 37, 71 Poplar Grove, Va., 393 Port Gibson, Miss., 370 Prentiss, Benjamin M., 301 Preston, N. D., 139 Rations, 108-42,206,226,291,320 Readville, Mass., 44-45 Reams Station, Va., 208,325-27 Revere Copper Company, 270 Reynolds, Thomas, 307 Richmond, 57, 139, 198, 230, 286, 313,320,358,364,391 Rip Raps, Va., 156, 162 Robertson's Tavern, Va., 134, 307 Rome, Ga., 400 Roxbury, Mass., 37-38,270 Saint Augustine, Fl., 248 Saint Louis,