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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 68 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 52 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 46 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Westminster (Maryland, United States) or search for Westminster (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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blicists of the United States, as well as by the great mass of our people, this seizure was deemed abundantly justified by the doctrines and practices of Great Britain, but especially by her long continued and never disavowed habit of impressing seamen from our merchant vessels, on the assumption that they were natives of Great Britain, and therefore liable at all times and indefeasibly to be remanded into her service, wherever found. In the able and carefully prepared manifesto Dated Westminster, Jan. 9th. 1813. whereby George IV., then Prince Regent, explained and justified the conduct of his Government touching the matters in controversy between it and our own, this doctrine is set forth as follows: The Order in Council of the 23d of June being officially communicated in America, the Government of the United States saw nothing in the repeal of the Orders which should, of itself, restore peace, unless Great Britain were prepared, in the first instance, substantially to relin