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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Granville (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Granville (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
, was born to them on July 10, and possibly also a second daughter, Caroline Eliza (1803). Subsequently they removed to Granville, Nova Scotia, in the neighborhood of Fanny's sister Nancy (Mrs. Thomas Delap). To this period belongs the following fraw Brunswick, to the care of Mr. Geo. Harden, City of St. John. Thus it reads: Abijah Garrison to his parents. Granville, April 4th, 1805. Ms. Much Respected Parents: This perhaps is the last you may Expect from me dated at Granville Granville as I am about to remove to Newbury Port in the united states, Where I Expect to Spend the remainder of my days. I have been following the Rule of false Position, or rather permutation, these Seven Last years, This gives 1798 as the date of the lpt of what I Owed him. At the same time Got a Great deal of Abuse from Rebecca. The Report Came here and Rung thro all Granville at my Expence. Since that I Consign'd to Nathan in behalf of Mr. Delap nine Barrels of Cider which it seem by the lett
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
she strayed into the Methodist meeting wearing a ruffle about her neck, as was the fashion of the day, she was startled by the minister's singling her out for rebuke, in his prayer, for what he considered a frivolous habit. Her gravity was nearly upset when the good man exclaimed, We pray thee, O Lord, to strip Sister Garrison of her Babylonish frills! and she was convulsed with laughter, hours after, at the thought of it. In September, 1810, she made her last visit to her old home at Granville, Nova Scotia, taking Lloyd with her; but he was too young to remember anything but the Indians whom he then saw, and who came to his aunt's house with their pappooses slung upon their backs. During the war of 1812-15, she removed to Lynn to pursue her vocation, taking James, her favorite son, a boy of much beauty and promise, with her, that he might learn the trade of shoemaking. Elizabeth was left in Mrs. Farnham's protecting care, while Lloyd went to live with Deacon Ezekiel Bartlett a