Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bartlett, William Francis, 1840-1876 (search)
Bartlett, William Francis, 1840-1876 Military officer; born in Haverhill, Mass., Jan. 6, 1840; was graduated at Harvard in 1862. He entered the volunteer army as captain in the summer of 1861; was engaged in the battle of Ball's Bluff (q. v.), and lost a leg in the siege of Yorktown in 1862. He was made colonel of a Massachusetts regiment in November, 1862, and took part in the capture of Port Hudson in 1863. In the siege of Petersburg (1864) he commanded a division of the 9th Corps, and at the explosion of the mine there he was made prisoner, but exchanged in September. In 1865 he was brevetted major-general of volunteers. He died in Pittsfield, Mass., Dec. 17, 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brickett, James, 1737-1818 (search)
Brickett, James, 1737-1818 Military officer: born in 1737; was a physician in Haverhill, Mass., until the beginning of the French and Indian War; was a surgeon in the army at Ticonderoga; was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill; appointed brigadier-general in the expedition designed for Canada in 1776; and commanded the American escort of Burgoyne's surrendered army from the Saratoga battle-field to Cambridge, Mass., in 1777. He died in Haverhill. Mass., Dec. 9, 1818. Brickett, James, 1737-1818 Military officer: born in 1737; was a physician in Haverhill, Mass., until the beginning of the French and Indian War; was a surgeon in the army at Ticonderoga; was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill; appointed brigadier-general in the expedition designed for Canada in 1776; and commanded the American escort of Burgoyne's surrendered army from the Saratoga battle-field to Cambridge, Mass., in 1777. He died in Haverhill. Mass., Dec. 9, 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
ch.42,34546 322*3,977 Lancaster, Pa41,45932,0119,448 Lincoln, Neb40,16955,154*14,985 Brockton, Mass.40,06327,29412,769 Binghamton, N. Y 39,64735.0054,642 Augusta, Ga39,41133,3006,141 Pawtucket, R. I.39,23127.63311,598 Altoona, Pa38,97330,3378,636 Wheeling. W. Va 38,87834,5224,356 Mobile, Ala38,46931,0767,393 Birmingham, Ala 38,41526,17812,237 Little Rock, Ark38,30725,87412,433 Springfield, O.38,25331,8956,358 Galveston, Tex 37,78929,0848,705 Tacoma, Wash37,71436,0061,708 Haverhill, Mass. 37,17527,4129,763 Spokane. Wash36,84819,92216,926 Terre Haute, Ind.36,67330,2176,456 Dubuque, Ia 36,29730,3115,986 Quincy, Ill. 36,25231,4944,758 South Bend, Ind.35,99921,81914,180 Salem, Mass. 35,95630,8015,155 Johnstown, Pa35,93621,80514,131 Elmira, N. Y 35,67230,8934,779 Allentown, Pa 35,41625,22810,188 Davenport, Ia35,25426,8728,382 McKeesport, Pa 34,22720,74113,486 Springfield. Ill.34,15924,9639,196 Chelsea, Mass. 34,07227,9096,163 Chester, Pa33,98820,22613,762 Yor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Christians, (search)
about 1,000 members, left the Methodist Episcopal Church in North Carolina and Virginia. On Aug. 4, 1794, they agreed to be known as Christians, and should acknowledge no head over the church but Christ, and should have no creed or discipline but the Bible. Abner Jones, M. D., left the Baptists in New England, and preached similar principles. He established the first churches to have no name but Christian at Lyndon, Vt., in 1800; at Bradford, Vt., in 1802; at Piermont, N. H., and at Haverhill, Mass., in 1803. In April, 1801, a religious excitement, called the falling exercise, began in southern Kentucky. It soon spread northward to the Presbyterian churches at Cane Ridge and Concord, over which Rev. Barton W. Stone was pastor. His usual May meeting was attended by 2,500 persons, many of whom were from other States. This revival lasted for several years, and spread over several States. The enthusiasm going beyond the denominational conservatism of those days, there were many
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dustin, Hannah, (search)
Dustin, Hannah, Heroine; born about 1660; married Thomas Dustin, of Haverhill, Mass., Dec. 3, 1677. When, in the spring of 1697, the French and Indians devastated the New England frontier settlements, Haverhill, within 30 miles of Boston, suffered severely, forty of its inhabitants being killed or carried into captivity. AmHaverhill, within 30 miles of Boston, suffered severely, forty of its inhabitants being killed or carried into captivity. Among the latter were a part of the family of Thomas Dustin, who was in the field when the savages first appeared. Mounting his horse, he hastened to his house to bear away his wife, eight children, and nurse to a place of safety. His youngest child was only a week old. He ordered his other children to fly. While he was lifting his, returning, they scalped the slain savages, and bore their trophies away in a bag, as evidence of the truth of the story they might relate to their friends. At Haverhill they were received as persons risen from the dead. Mrs. Dustin found her husband and children safe. Soon afterwards she bore to the governor, at Boston, the gu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Haverhill, massacre at. (search)
Haverhill, massacre at. After the attack upon Deerfield (q. v.), Hertel de Rouville, willing to lead his motley band in the work of murdering helpless women and children, ascended the St. Francis, and, passing the White Mountains, made their rendezvous at Winnipiseogee, where they expected to meet a party of Abenakes. Disappointed in this, they descended the Merrimac to Haverhill, a little cluster of thirty cottages and log cabins, in the centre of which was a new meetinghouse. On the nHaverhill, a little cluster of thirty cottages and log cabins, in the centre of which was a new meetinghouse. On the night of Aug. 29, 1708, when every family was slumbering, this band of savages rested near, and at daylight the next morning fell with fury upon the startled sleepers of the village. The mid-day sun shone on a charred village, strewn with murdered men, women, and children. Hearing of these cruelties, Col. Peter Schuyler, of Albany, wrote to Vaudreuil, governor of Canada: I hold it my duty towards God and my neighbors to prevent, if possible, these barbarous and heathen cruelties. My heart s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Havre de Grace, attack on. (search)
eake Bay, and near the mouth of the Susquehanna River, containing about sixty houses, mostly built of wood. It was on the postroad between Philadelphia and Baltimore, as it now is upon the railway between the two cities. On the night of May 2, 1813, Sir George Cockburn, commander of a British squadron, engaged in marauding on the shores of Chesapeake Bay, approached the village, and at dawn on the morning of the 3d the inhabitants were awakened by the sound of arms. Fifteen Village of Haverhill, scene of the massacre. or twenty barges, filled with armed men, were seen approaching, when a few lingering militia opened heavy guns upon them from a battery on an eminence called Point Comfort. These were answered by grape-shot from the British. The drums in the village beat to arms. The affrighted inhabitants, half-dressed, rushed to the streets, the non-combatants flying in terror to places of safety. Very soon hissing Congreve rockets set buildings on fire in the town, and thes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hazen, Moses 1733-1803 (search)
Hazen, Moses 1733-1803 Military officer; born in Haverhill, Mass., in 1733; served in the French and Indian War (q. v.); was in the attack on Louisburg in 1758; and with Wolfe at Quebec in 1759, where he distinguished himself. He fought bravely at Sillery in 1760, and was made a lieutenant. A half-pay British officer, he was residing near St. John, Canada, when the American Revolution broke out. He furnished supplies to Montgomery's troops, and afterwards became an efficient officer in the Continental army. His property was destroyed by the British. In June, 1781, he was made a brigadier-general. He and his two brothers emigrated to Vermont after the war. He died in Troy, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1803.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, James Athearn 1790-1853 (search)
Jones, James Athearn 1790-1853 Author; born in Tisbury, Mass., June 4, 1790; received a common-school education, and engaged in journalism in Philadelphia in 1826; later was editor in Baltimore, Md., and in Buffalo, N. Y. His publications include Traditions of the North American Indians, or tales of an Indian camp; Gold medal awarded by Congress to Jacob Jones. Letter to an English gentleman on English libels of America; and Haverhill, or memoirs of an officer in the army of Wolfe. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., in August, 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mooers, Benjamin 1758-1838 (search)
Mooers, Benjamin 1758-1838 Military officer; born in Haverhill, Mass., April 1, 1758; was in the Continental army; at the surrender of Burgoyne; and served as lieutenant in Hazen's regiment to the end of the war. In 1783 he settled in the wilderness on the western shore of Lake Champlain, near the present Plattsburg. He was eight years in the New York legislature, and, as major-general of militia, commanded that body of soldiers in the battle of Plattsburg (q. v.) in 1814. He died in Plattsburg, N. Y., Feb. 20, 1838.
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