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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
very. He was the relative and coadjutor of the Buxtons, Gurneys, and Frys; and his whole life, extending almost to threescore and ten years, was a pure and beautiful example of Christian benevolence. He had travelled over Europe, and visited most of its sovereigns, to plead against the slave-trade and slavery; and had twice before made visits to this country, under impressions of religious duty. He was the father of the Right Hon. William Edward Forster. He visited my father's house in Haverhill during his first tour in the United States. the years are many since his hand Was laid upon my head, Too weak and young to understand The serious words he said. Yet often now the good man's look Before me seems to swim, As if some inward feeling took The outward guise of him. As if, in passion's heated war, Or near temptation's charm, Through him the low-voiced monitor Forewarned me of the harm. Stranger and pilgrim! from that day Of meeting, first and last, Wherever Duty's pathway l
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Occasional Poems (search)
efoot boys, The nutted woods we wandered through, To friendship, love, and social joys We consecrate anew. Here shall the tender song be sung, And memory's dirges soft and low, And wit shall sparkle on the tongue, And mirth shall overflow, Harmless as summer lightning plays From a low, hidden cloud by night, A light to set the hills ablaze, But not a bolt to smite. In sunny South and prairied West Are exiled hearts remembering still, As bees their hive, as birds their nest, The homes of Haverhill. They join us in our rites to-day; And, listening, we may hear, erelong, From inland lake and ocean bay, The echoes of our song. Kenoza! o'er no sweeter lake Shall morning break or noon-cloud sail,— No fairer face than thine shall take The sunset's golden veil. Long be it ere the tide of trade Shall break with harsh-resounding din The quiet of thy banks of shade, And hills that fold thee in. Still let thy woodlands hide the hare, The shy loon sound his trumpet-note, Wing-weary from h
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), At sundown (search)
wrong. The world-wide laugh Provoked thereby might well have shaken half The walls of Slavery down, ere yet the ball And mine of battle overthrew them all. Haverhill. 1640-1890. Read at the Celebration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the City, July 2, 1890. O River winding to the sea! We call the old time make The sad world happier for its sake. As tenants of uncertain stay, So may we live our little day That only grateful hearts shall fill The homes we leave in Haverhill. The singer of a farewell rhyme, Upon whose outmost verge of time The shades of night are falling down, I pray, God bless the good old town! To G. G. An Autograph. The daughter of Daniel Gurteen, Esq., delegate from Haverhill, England, to the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary celebration of Haverhill, Massachusetts. The Rev. John Ward of the former place and many of his old parishioners were the pioneer settlers of the new town on the Merrimac. graceful in name and in thysel
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
wn native isle, And contentment and joy to each warm-hearted friend Shall be the heart's prayer of the lonely Exile! Haverhill, 1825. The Deity. The Prophet stood On the high mount, and saw the tempest cloud Pour the fierce whirlwind from itn forces which destroyed Deerfield and massacred its inhabitants, in 1703. He was afterwards killed in the attack upon Haverhill. Tradition says that, on examining his dead body, his head and face were found to be perfectly smooth, without the slin forces which destroyed Deerfield and massacred its inhabitants, in 1703. He was afterwards killed in the attack upon Haverhill. Tradition says that, on examining his dead body, his head and face were found to be perfectly smooth, without the slion his Eightieth Birthday. 1890R. S. S., At Deer Island on the Merrimac. Burning Drift-Wood. The Captain's Well. Haverhill. To G. G. Milton, on Memorial Window. The Last Eve of Summer. To E. C. S. 1891James Russell Lowell. Preston Power
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of Titles (search)
Funeral Tree of the Sokokis, i. 41. Gallows, The, III. 275. Garden, IV. 215. Garibaldi, IV. 119. Garrison, III. 269. Garrison of Cape Ann, The, i. 166. Gift of Tritemius, The, i. 172. Giving and Taking, II. 314. Godspeed, IV. 218. Golden Wedding of Longwood, The, IV. 197. Gone, IV. 38. Grave by the Lake, The, IV. 241. Greeting, II. 178. Greeting, A, IV. 216. Halleck, Fitz-Greene, IV. 136. Hampton Beach, II. 14. Haschish, The, III. 173. Haverhill, IV. 303. Hazel Blossoms, II. 72. Healer, The, II. 308. Help, II. 328. Henchman, The, i. 373. Hermit of the Thebaid, The, i. 144. Hero, The, IV. 80. Hill-Top, The, IV. 56. Hive at Gettysburg, The, III. 263. Holmes, O. W., on his Eightieth Birthday, IV. 302. Holy Land, The, II. 230. Home-Coming of the Bride, The, IV. 393. Homestead, The, i. 413. Hooper, Lucy, IV. 26. Howard at Atlanta, III. 264. How Mary Grew, IV. 126. How the Robin Came, i. 4