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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
, the first blow we aimed at their nefarious slave system. We do not acknowledge them to be within the pale of Christianity, of republicanism, of humanity. This we say dispassionately, and not for the sake of using strong language. With us, their threats, clamors, broils, contortions, avail nothing; and with the entire North they are fast growing less and less formidable. Like sentiments began to be heard from others at Lib. 11.189. antislavery meetings in Massachusetts, Thus, at Hingham, Nov. 4, 1841, Edmund Quincy showed that slavery had already destroyed the Union; and Frederick Douglass, that the Union pledged the North to return fugitives—wherefore, He is no true abolitionist who does not go against this Union (Lib. 11: 189). but as yet disunion formed no part of the official creed or programme of the State Society, which did, however, include, as an object Lib. 11.166. to be striven for, an amendment to the Constitution either abolishing slavery, or exonerating the p
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
gentility, successive generations who have not demeaned themselves by doing anything useful), and is a man of excellent talents, good taste, and good education. . . . Last summer he accompanied the agents of one of the series of the Hundred Western Conventions as a volunteer, receiving only his travelling expenses. He also attended our Hundred Massachusetts Conventions, so that he has had some experience in the field. He was also for a time the editor of the village paper published in Hingham [Mass.], so that he is not without some knowledge of the details of a newspaper establishment. He is, moreover, in perfect unity with the Boston Clique, which is a great thing, you may be sure. office editor, Edmund Quincy, and Mrs. Chapman. He joined in the protests formally entered against the new policy by some of those whose names have just been given. The nature of the objections will appear from the following extracts from Mr. Garrison's rejoinder through the Liberator, on his return t