Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10.. You can also browse the collection for Manchester (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Manchester (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Bell. One of the last clippings Brooks inserted in the scrap book was an obituary notice of his college friend, Bell. Samuel Dana Bell (1797-1868) was a son of Governor Samuel Bell of New Hampshire. He studied law and practiced in Concord and Manchester. In 1859 he was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court. He resigned in 1865 and died at Manchester July, 1868. This date in August, 1819, was chosen because that was the month in which Commencement exercises were then held. Manchester July, 1868. This date in August, 1819, was chosen because that was the month in which Commencement exercises were then held. Brooks took good rank in his course, and on graduation continued his theological studies at Harvard. In the month mentioned in the record of the wager he took his Master's degree and delivered the valedictory in Latin. This paper is still preserved. In November, 1820, he was invited to become pastor of the Third Church at Hingham at a salary of a thousand dollars, and here he remained until January, 1839, a period of eighteen years. Time permits only the mention of the activities of this en
s, and thirty-two feet wide; the draw was the design of Lemuel Cox, and eight lamps lighted the bridge at night. The instant success of two ventures in bridge building made a strong impression on the flourishing merchants of Salem and Beverly, and, 13 June, 1787, a subscription was started to build a bridge between those two towns. Two hundred shares were at once subscribed for, and sixteen towns in Essex County favored it. Eighty-five poor widows of the Revolutionary War, resident in Manchester, with one hundred and thirtyfive fatherless children, wanted it as a highway to Salem, where they carried their manufactured cloth. Danvers and a part of Salem opposed it. After a strenuous fight the project materialized, 17 November, 1787, with George Cabot, John Cabot, John Fisk, Israel Thorndike, and Joseph White as corporators. Before i March, 1788, they had contracted for pine and oak timber, made terms with Lemuel Cox to build the bridge, and settled other details. Cox was to be