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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 128 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 9 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 27: expedition through Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. (search)
for taking them away. The last and best reason was that the undeniable right of freedom was theirs, and it was the duty of every Christian officer and man to help them escape from the most miserable slavery that ever existed in any part of the world. General Grant, though disappointed in the result of this last expedition, was not discouraged He saw that this was the last attempt that could be made in this direction, and turned his attention to other ways, believing, with the Duke of Marlborough, that though all trials might fail, there was always one way left to get into a fortified city. So evident was it to the Confederates that in both the Yazoo Pass and the Steele's Bayou expedition they had left the northern flank of Vicksburg unprotected, that they removed the depot at once. Not only that, though there was no apparent necessity for it, they went to work to strengthen their left flank also, as far down the river as Grand Gulf, thinking, perhaps, that the gun-boats might