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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 32 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Ripley (Minnesota, United States) or search for Fort Ripley (Minnesota, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ecting into a narrow bay. The bay was protected by Fort Pinkney, Fort Ripley, Fort Moultrie, Fort Beauregard. Fort Sumter, Battery Bee, Batter part of Sullivan's Island — from Battery Gregg, Fort Johnson, Fort Ripley and Castle Pinkney, and some smaller batteries. To run past thee of which will be at a point about midway between Forts Sumter and Ripley, and to the southward of the middle-ground shoal. It will be formed by the heavy guns of Fort Johnston, Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney, Battery Bee, the north-western and western faces of Fort Sumter. The guns of Forts Johnston and Ripley and Castle Pinckney will open on the leading vessels as they come within easy range, care being taken that evnt Battery and Battery Glover, with such guns of Forts Johnston and Ripley and Castle Pinckney as will bear. Concentration on the leading vesnel. If he does, a circle of fire will be formed by the guns of Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney and White Point Battery. The position of tor
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
e the Federals were making the most assiduous efforts to get into Sumter by the way of Wagner and Gregg, they overlooked entirely the obstacles still remaining on Sullivan's Island to prevent their holding it after capture; while Fort Johnson, Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney and the iron batteries stood ready to pour in their cross-fire, as they had done when their attack on Sumter opened the Rebellion. The capture of James Island and the occupation of the works upon it, which was feasible, wouldnfederate accounts, which there seems no reason to doubt, gave the armament of the works as follows: Sumter 44, Moultrie 21, Battery Bee 6, Fort Beauregard 2, Cumming's Point 2, and Wagner 19; total 94. To these must be added the batteries at Fort Ripley, Castle Pinckney, Mount Pleasant, Fort Johnson, Battery Gregg, and the Creek batteries. Altogether, the naval commanders, and all with them, deserve high commendation for accomplishing what they did before Charleston; their efforts, though