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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Batesville (Mississippi, United States) or search for Batesville (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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ing been destroyed in compliance with General Hurlbut's orders. On the first instant, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, the force sent from Collierville to intercept the enemy before he could reach Holly Springs, arrived at Mount Pleasant, where it was learned that the rear-guard of the rebels had, a few hours before, passed south. Pushing ahead vigorously, our troops followed them to Hudsonville, twenty miles further. By this time it had been discovered that Chalmers had moved north from Panola, and formed a junction with Forrest, whose force was thus augmented to six thousand. Our single brigade had consequently to hold its ground and await reenforcements. These arrived next day, Colonel Mizener's brigade having been sent down from Collierville. For two days the pursuit was continued, but necessarily with caution, as Forrest's force was known to be yet superior to ours. When near Holly Springs, reliable information was brought in that the enemy's main column, reenforced by F
s, and, if possible, create a diversion in favor of General Sherman, with whose rear it was thought the cavalry expedition might in due season communicate. It was stated that the enemy were posted in force beyond the Tallahatchie, and that they would determinedly resist the Federal advance. After two days heavy marching, the expedition reached the Tallahatchie. A brigade of infantry, temporarily attached to the expedition, under command of Colonel McMillen, was sent forward and threatened Panola, and afterward to Wyatt, for a similar purpose. The move was successful. The infantry attracted the attention and the forces of the enemy to these points, when General Smith swung his cavalry around and to New-Albany, whence he crossed without firing a shot. He then pushed boldly forward to a point near the Pontotoc, in the vicinity of Houston, where he encountered some State confederate troops, under the command of Gholson, numbering near six thousand. They stampeded at his approach, th