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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 6 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Benton (Mississippi, United States) or search for Benton (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the cavalry in Mississippi, from January to March, 1864.-report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
ts from Memphis and above, and evacuating the Mississippi and Central railroad. To oppose this force, Jackson's division was in position as follows: Ross's Texas brigade was guarding the Yazoo river and Mississippi Central railroad, posted at Benton. Starke's Mississippi brigade was at Brownsville, watching the crossings of the Big Black, opposite Vicksburg. Adams's brigade was moved from the vicinity of Natchez to Raymond. About the 28th of January the enemy commenced their demonstratit to the Yazoo country by Brigadier-General Jackson, and Richardson's brigade of Tennessee and Forrest's cavalry were sent by my order to Grenada, from Starkesville on the 24th. General Ross, about the 28th of February, while going into camp near Benton, was charged by about 80 negro cavalry from Yazoo City. About an equal number of the Texans charged them, and before they got to Yazoo City (10 miles), 75 of the negroes were caught and killed, as they continued to offer resistance and to run. O
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. Headquarters cavalry division, Benton, Miss., March 21, 1864. Major,--In compliance with orders from the Major-General commanding I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command, consisting of three brigades, commanded respect Jackson, Brigadier-General Commanding. To Major Wm. Elliott, A. A. and I. General. Report of General Richardson. Headquarters West Tennessee brigade, Benton, Miss., March 7th, 1864. Major,--On the 23rd of February, I received an order from Major-General S. D. Lee, commanding cavalry west of Alabama, to move my brigade ined to return to Grenada by slow marches, resting my men and horses. I received now several dispatches from Brigadier-General L. S. Ross, from the vicinity of Benton, indicating the presence of the enemy at Yazoo City. I moved in that direction, and on the evening of the 4th of March formed a junction with him at the Ponds, s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
in Cornay's four guns. He also says that the Cricket was struck thirty-eight times with shells and solid shot, and that she and the Juliet and Hindman lost forty-seven killed and wounded. J. L. B. May, 1867. On the morning of the 26th of April two gunboats of the enemy, one an iron plated monitor, supposed to be the Osage, and the other of the class called tin-clad, mounting eight guns and protected by about an inch of iron, were discovered lying near De Loach's Bluff in Red river. Benton's Rifle section, Captain Benton, commanding, and Nettles's Smooth-bore section, Lieutenant Smith, commanding, (Captain Nettles present), supported by Major Williams, with a battalion of sharpshooters, were placed in position and opened fire on the tin-clad, who, after severe punishment, rapidly fled after an engagement of thirty minutes. The iron plated monitor poured a heavy enfilading fire on the artillery and its support, but no attention was paid to it, in obedience to general artille
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's campaign in Mississippi in winter of 1864. (search)
1864. Report of General Ross. Headquarters Texas brigade, I. C. D., Benton, Miss., March 13th, 1864. Captain,--In compliance with your call for a report ouary, I received an order from the Division Commander to take position near Benton, Miss., and was charged with guarding the country west of Big Black river. A few e division east of Pearl river, reached me at the Ponds four miles west of Benton, Miss., February 8th. I moved at once, and travelled as rapidly as my teams wouldrders from General Jackson, I returned again to Yazoo county. Arrived at Benton, Miss., on the 28th, and was about encamping my command at the Ponds, four miles west of Benton, when a squadron of negro cavalry from Yazoo city came in sight, I immediately ordered detachments of the Sixth and Ninth regiments, which happened to o withdraw all our forces, which we did, retiring to our former encampment near Benton. The following morning the enemy all left Yazoo city, evidently anticipating