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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 146 14 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 46 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Booneville (Mississippi, United States) or search for Booneville (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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they were but few. Major-General Halleck must be a very credulous man to believe the absurd story of that farmer. He ought to know that the burning of two or more cars on a railroad is not sufficient to make Beauregard frantic and ridiculous, especially when I expected to hear every moment of the capture of his marauding party, whose departure from Farmington had been communicated to me the day before, and I had given in consequence all necessary orders; but a part of my forces passed Booneville an hour before the arrival of Col. Elliott's command, and the other part arrived just in time to drive it away, and liberate the convalescents captured; unfortunately, however, not in time to save four of the sick, who were barbarously consumed in the station-house. Let Col. Elliott's name descend to infamy as the author of such a revolting deed. Gen. Halleck did not capture nine locomotives. It was only by the accidental destruction of a bridge before some trains had passed that he got
, thence to bear north of west so as to strike the Mobile and Ohio Railroad at some point near Booneville, and destroy the track in the most effective possible manner, so as to prevent the passage of osition, which was to take place the very morning Col. Elliott carried out his instructions at Booneville, and the last rebels left Corinth. In accordance with the above order, the brigade started olumn was again in motion, and marching all night to the north-west arrived in the vicinity of Booneville at three P. M. Reconnoitring parties were sent out to ascertain the condition of things about destroyed, when an order was received from Col. Elliott directing Col. Sheridan to join him at Booneville. In the mean time the Second Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Hatch, commanding, under the immediate super town, had taken several hundred prisoners, belonging to a regiment that had been stationed at Booneville to guard the town and road, completely surprised and running about wildly upon the sudden entr
my, and found the bridges between Rienzi and Booneville so recently fired that the timbers were nearoon of the first June, about four miles from Booneville, and chased them within one mile of the townon the morning of the second June, I entered Booneville, and during all of that day my cavalry was cery road leading southward and westward from Booneville to Twenty-mile Creek. On the next day I ms as far as the pursuit has been carried. Booneville is twenty-four miles by the railroad from Cohe burning cars, fired by Colonel Elliott at Booneville, that he pronounced it to be at Corinth, andhat reached him, that the explosions were at Booneville. That he sent all over town to ascertain th this search a messenger arrived direct from Booneville confirming the report that the Yankees were d unasked for. Colonel Elliott arrived at Booneville on the thirtieth of May, at two o'clock A. Mby some skulkers who were afraid to approach Booneville while Colonel Elliott was there. The char