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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 34 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 31 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 23 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Burnsville (Mississippi, United States) or search for Burnsville (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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cars to-day (20th March), and Statham's brigade (Crittenden's division). The brigade will halt at Iuka, the regiment at Burnsville; Cleburne's brigade, Hardee's division, except regiment, at Burnsville; and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, aBurnsville; and Carroll's brigade, Crittenden's division, and Helm's cavalry, at Tuscumbia; Bowen's brigade at Cortland; Breckinridge's brigade, here; the regiments of cavalry of Adams and Wharton, on the opposite bank of the river; Scott's Louisiana regiment at Pulaski, sending forward supplies; Morgan's caransportation will be ready there for the other troops to follow immediately from those points, and, if necessary, from Burnsville. The cavalry will cross and move forward as soon as their trains can be passed over the railroad-bridge. I have try. Jefferson Davis. On the 25th of March General Johnston completed the concentration of his troops. On that day he wrote to the President from Corinth, My force is now united, holding Burnsville, Iuka, and Tuscumbia, with one division here.
Sherman, finding a Confederate battery at Eastport, disembarked below at the mouth of the Yellow River, and started for Burnsville; but, becoming discouraged at the continued rains, the swollen streams, the bad roads, and the resistance he met with ftance of some twelve or fourteen miles. The railroad system lies on its western and southern slope, and, as far east as Burnsville, passes through a poor, fiat, and swampy country, covered with the primeval forest. There are twenty bridges between Caring date nearest to the time desired. Distances. By Land.Miles. From Corinth to Iuka. 23 From Corinth to Burnsville.10 From Corinth to Chewalla11 1/2 From Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 Fromh to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 On Tennessee Rive
ve shared in the glories of a victory. The rumor of this occurrence also gave rise to the following vigorous protest from Governor George W. Johnson: Burnsville, Mississippi, March 26, 1862. My dear sir: A rumor has reached me that has filled me with just alarm for our cause, and which induces me again to write to you, relyll behind him with 10,000. Confederate forces-40,000-ordered forward to offer battle near Pittsburg. Division from Bethel, main body from Corinth, reserve from Burnsville, converging to-morrow near Monterey on Pittsburg. Beauregard second in command, Polk the left, Bragg the centre, Hardee the right wing, Breckinridge the reservt of Corinth. VI.-Strong guards will be left at the railroad-bridges between Iuka and Corinth, to be furnished in due proportions from the commands at Iuka, Burnsville, and Corinth. VII.-Proper guards will be left at the camps of the several regiments of the forces in the field; corps commanders will determine the strength
e other divisions whose presence was necessary to the attack. These movements were construed by General Lew Wallace as a reconnaissance in force against his own division at Crump's Landing, and held him in check during the 5th and the 6th, the first day of the battle. Breckinridge's three brigades — a division, in fact, but by courtesy a reserve corps-having received their orders on the afternoon of April 3d, E. P. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, p. 87. moved from Burnsville on April 4th, at 3 A. M., by way of Farmington, toward Monterey, fourteen miles distant. Some Enfield rifles, with accoutrements and ammunition, just received, were distributed about nightfall to supply deficiencies, and rations were prepared during the night. Ibid. The road was even worse than those from Corinth. The corps struggled painfully on, with poor progress. After a hard day's march, it bivouacked on the road. Part of the artillery was late at night reaching its position