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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 40 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 25 3 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 19 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Columbus (Mississippi, United States) or search for Columbus (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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ous to their cause as a defeat would have been, and though it appears from papers found in the deserted camp, that the rebels have depots of supplies at Okolona, Columbus and Grenada, still it seems impossible for them to long subsist a large force any — where in the State, when once Mobile is in our possession, and the Mississippongholds which have fallen into our hands, without bloodshed, since the commencement of the present year. Manassas, Yorktown, Norfolk, Bowling Green, Nashville, Columbus, Little Rock and Corinth — all capable of a lengthened defence, yet all captured without even a show of resistance. Corinth was indeed a stronghold, and its i the order was given, and Corinth was evacuated. The sick, of whom there were a great number in the hospitals, were taken away first, some being removed to Columbus, Miss., and others to Grand Junction, preparatory to being forwarded to Jackson. Next came the stores, the greater portion of which were taken off on Wednesday. We
lice which separated us from the rebels. The approach is by a long and complete curve, in which the river runs, as at Columbus, right into the Chickasaw bluff, where the stream suddenly narrows until it becomes from two miles wide to nearly half aand bluff rises to the height of a hundred and fifty feet, and in general appearance is remarkably like the situation of Columbus, with the exception that the fortifications are placed lower down in the bend. It is impossible for any one who is athe most formidable guns, but also subjecting the enemy to the most conical fire in approaching the place. Stronger than Columbus by nature, it was equally well fortified by art. Twice stronger than Island No.10, for the reason that the approach was ined men could have successfully held it against ten times their number. As a defensible point it is even preferable to Columbus, and although more guns were mounted at Island No.10 than at Pillow, the former place will not compare with the latter e
ississippi for the purpose of capturing Corinth, or breaking our line of communication, and forcing us to retreat toward Columbus. These rumors gained strength until the first of October, when strong cavalry scouts sent out for the purpose, demonseral McKean with his division will occupy the present position: Gen. Davies will occupy the line between the Memphis and Columbus road, General Hamilton with his division will take position between the rebel works on the Purdy and on the Hamburgh roaan Dorn's army, Villipigue, and the remnant of Breckinridge's corps.) They were in the angle between the Memphis and the Columbus roads. Our left was comparatively free; our right very assailable. They outnumbered us probably two to one. The plaell-tried division batteries, Williams and Robinette, the Memphis Railroad and the Chewalla road extending nearly to the Columbus road. Davies's tried division was placed in the centre, which was retired, reaching to battery Powell, Hamilton's staun
ississippi for the purpose of capturing Corinth, or breaking our line of communication, and forcing us to retreat toward Columbus. These rumors gained strength until the first of October, when strong cavalry scouts sent out for the purpose, demonseral McKean with his division will occupy the present position: Gen. Davies will occupy the line between the Memphis and Columbus road, General Hamilton with his division will take position between the rebel works on the Purdy and on the Hamburgh roaan Dorn's army, Villipigue, and the remnant of Breckinridge's corps.) They were in the angle between the Memphis and the Columbus roads. Our left was comparatively free; our right very assailable. They outnumbered us probably two to one. The plaell-tried division batteries, Williams and Robinette, the Memphis Railroad and the Chewalla road extending nearly to the Columbus road. Davies's tried division was placed in the centre, which was retired, reaching to battery Powell, Hamilton's staun