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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 389 39 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 122 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 92 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 76 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Farmington (Mississippi, United States) or search for Farmington (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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ange the seat of war thence for an offensive campaign in Missouri. But Fortune denied him this advantage. Although his military necessities compelled him to withdraw Hardee from Arkansas, General Johnston refused other applications for transfer thence to Kentucky. He was, at this time, encouraged to hope something from Jeff Thompson's activity, which promised fair, but was soon after extinguished by defeat. He ordered Thompson, September 29th, to remove his forces to the vicinity of Farmington, on the route to St. Louis, in order to relieve the pressure on Price; and to keep the field as long as he was able to do so with safety to his command. General Johnston remained at Columbus superintending its fortifications, and directing the movement and organization of troops, until October 12th. Early in October Buckner advised him that the enemy was about to advance against Bowling Green. He replied: Hold on Bowling Green and its surroundings-general Johnston's map. to Bowling
stances. By Land.Miles. From Corinth to Iuka. 23 From Corinth to Burnsville.10 From Corinth to Chewalla11 1/2 From Corinth to Bethel23 From Corinth to Purdy22 From Corinth to Eastport30 From Corinth to Wynn's Landing21 From Corinth to Farmington5 From Corinth to Hamburg19 From Corinth to Monterey11 From Corinth to Pittsburg23 From Corinth to Savannah30 Iuka to Eastport8 Burnsville to Wynn's15 Bethel to Purdy4 Bethel to Savannah23 Monterey to Purdy15 Monterey to Farmington9 Farmington9 On Tennessee River going down.Miles. From Chickasaw to Bear Creek1 From Bear Creek to Eastport1 From Eastport to Cook's Landing1 From Cook's Landing to Indian Creek21 From Indian Creek to Cook's Landing.5 From Cook's Landing to Yellow Creek5 From Yellow Creek to Wynn's Landing11 From Wynn's Landing to Wood's2 From Wood's to North Bend Landing4 1/2 North Bend Landing to Chambers's Creek4 From Chambers's Creek to Hamburg4 From Hamburg to Lick Creek2 From Lick Creek to Pittsburg2 Fr
to the attack. These movements were construed by General Lew Wallace as a reconnaissance in force against his own division at Crump's Landing, and held him in check during the 5th and the 6th, the first day of the battle. Breckinridge's three brigades — a division, in fact, but by courtesy a reserve corps-having received their orders on the afternoon of April 3d, E. P. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, p. 87. moved from Burnsville on April 4th, at 3 A. M., by way of Farmington, toward Monterey, fourteen miles distant. Some Enfield rifles, with accoutrements and ammunition, just received, were distributed about nightfall to supply deficiencies, and rations were prepared during the night. Ibid. The road was even worse than those from Corinth. The corps struggled painfully on, with poor progress. After a hard day's march, it bivouacked on the road. Part of the artillery was late at night reaching its position, owing to the difficulty of the road. Breckin
reported by Jordan after the battle of Shiloh, 32,212, give an army of nearly 50,000 men fit for duty. Reinforcements were poured in from every quarter. But, with an aggregate on the rolls of 112,092, the effective total could not be gotten above a reported effective force of 52,706 men. The sick and absent numbered more than one-half the army. No sudden epidemic had smitten the camp; the sickness was the effect of causes evident from the hour of retreat. Halleck had taken position at Farmington, and was advancing spade in hand; and Beauregard intrenched to resist him. Digging in the trenches among those marshes, with consequent malaria; bad food; neglect of police duty; impure and insufficient water, the drainage of swamps and heavily charged with magnesia and rotten limestone; these causes, acting in conjunction with certain moral influences, the depression of retreat and inaction, produced obstinate types of diarrhea and typhoid fever. The attempt to bore artesian wells faile