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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) or search for Greenwood (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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time there was continued skirmishing along the river till the ninth, when our forces reached Yazoo City, where a detachment surprised and captured five rebel pickets. On the eleventh, Colonel Coates reembarked, and proceeded up the river to Greenwood, and found Fort Pemberton evacuated by the enemy. The First Missouri cavalry, Colonel Osband commanding, went out from this point, had a fight, lost five men, and went to within five miles of Grenada; and ascertaining that Forrest was at that Fort Pemberton evacuated by the enemy. The First Missouri cavalry, Colonel Osband commanding, went out from this point, had a fight, lost five men, and went to within five miles of Grenada; and ascertaining that Forrest was at that place in force, retraced his steps and joined the main command. Several days were spent in loading cotton, which was found along the river-shore, and after having secured one thousand six hundred bales, the expedition returned to Yazoo City on the twenty-eighth. Immediately upon arriving there, Major Cook went out with a small cavalry force, and encountered a brigade of Texas cavalry, numbering one thousand five hundred, commanded by Brigadier-General L. S. Ross. A sharp fight ensued, in wh
illed, wounded, and missing. The First Mississippi cavalry lost two Lieutenants and several men. Our whole loss is set down at one hundred and thirty--that of the enemy at three hundred. Lieutenant Ingersoll's account camp Eleventh Illinois infantry, Vicksburgh, Mississippi, March 15, 1864. dear C.: I am not much in the mood for letter-writing to-day, but I will try and write a short one to you. My last was written, I believe, before we reached Yazoo City, on our way down from Greenwood. Colonel Coates received orders while at Sulon to proceed to Yazoo City, take possession of the place, and send to Vicksburgh for camp equipage. When within about six miles of the city, (by land, about fourteen by the river,) Colonel Osband's First Mississippi cavalry, A. D., was disembarked, with instructions to proceed by land to the rear of the town and take possession of all the roads leading, therefrom, in order to gobble up any persons that might attempt to escape, and also to reco
ver. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report of Lieutenant E. K. Owen. United States steamer Marmora, off Greenwood, Miss., February 15, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the arrival of the expedition at this place on last evening. We met with no opposition, excepting a smart skirmish at the edge of the woods a mile back of this place, between the rebel r is also falling rapidly, with only eight feet in the channel above Honey Island. I shall take good care that no boats shall get caught. The Star of the West is still in the channel in the Tallahatchie, with her wheels and upper-works out. Fort Pemberton is entirely destroyed, as also all the cotton out of which it was built. We have succeeded, so far, in gathering about four hundred and fifty bales of cotton, of which eighty are on the gunboats, and the rest on the transports. Fifty-three