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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 49 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 31 7 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 26 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 24 24 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 17 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Grenada (Mississippi, United States) or search for Grenada (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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It took three hundred prisoners, captured one steamer, burned five, took six cannon, two hundred and fifty small arms, and eight hundred horses and mules. No loss on our side reported. Small expeditions were also sent against Canton, Pontotoc, Grenada, and Natchez, Mississippi. At Grenada a large amount of rolling stock was destroyed. Near Natchez, General Ransom captured five thousand head of Texas cattle, a number of prisoners and teams, and a large amount of ammunition. The other expediGrenada a large amount of rolling stock was destroyed. Near Natchez, General Ransom captured five thousand head of Texas cattle, a number of prisoners and teams, and a large amount of ammunition. The other expeditions were also successful, meeting with very little opposition. As soon as his army was supplied and rested, General Grant sent a force under General Steele to Helena to cooperate with General Schofield's troops against Little, Rock, and another under Generals Ord and Herron to New-Orleans, to reenforce General Banks for such ulterior operations as he might deem proper to undertake. Some expeditions were also sent to the Red River, and to Harrisonburgh and Monroe, on the Washita, to break up
ight, with a loss of six men wounded. From this time there was continued skirmishing along the river till the ninth, when our forces reached Yazoo City, where a detachment surprised and captured five rebel pickets. On the eleventh, Colonel Coates reembarked, and proceeded up the river to Greenwood, and found Fort Pemberton evacuated by the enemy. The First Missouri cavalry, Colonel Osband commanding, went out from this point, had a fight, lost five men, and went to within five miles of Grenada; and ascertaining that Forrest was at that place in force, retraced his steps and joined the main command. Several days were spent in loading cotton, which was found along the river-shore, and after having secured one thousand six hundred bales, the expedition returned to Yazoo City on the twenty-eighth. Immediately upon arriving there, Major Cook went out with a small cavalry force, and encountered a brigade of Texas cavalry, numbering one thousand five hundred, commanded by Brigadier-
found at this place, which was seized for the use of the army. A large number of private dwellings were burned here as well as at other places on the route, but they were in nearly every case deserted houses and their owners in the rebel army. The burning was mostly done by stragglers, and there were strict orders issued against it by the Commanding Generals. The railroad had been put in good repair by the rebels from Meridian to Jackson, and from the latter place through Canton north to Grenada. It was by this road that the confederates at Meridian and Mobile got most of their supplies. The trains ran until the day before we arrived. We destroyed the road at different places all the way through to Meridian. The march from Brandon through Moreton to Hillsboro was devoid of interest, except an occasional skirmish with the enemy's cavalry, in which they invariably got the worst of it. This is in part owing to the fact that our cavalry always dismount in skirmishing with the ene
, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Additional report of Lieutenant E. K. Owen. United States steamer Marmora, off Greenwood, Miss., February 15, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the arrival of the expedition at this place on last evening. We met with no opposition, excepting a smart skirmish at the edge of the woods a mile back of this place, between the rebel cavalry under Forrest, and our own under Colonel Osband. We had two wounded. The enemy has fallen back to Grenada, and are fortifying that place. If the way is tolerably clear and the force not too heavy, our cavalry force (two hundred and fifty) and a portion of the infantry (five hundred) will go out in the morning. If we find the enemy too strong, we will go down the river, as the Tallahatchie and Yallabusha are entirely too low to ascend. This river is also falling rapidly, with only eight feet in the channel above Honey Island. I shall take good care that no boats shall get caught. The Star o