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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 45 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 81 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 66 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 42 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) or search for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
k. Davis determined to have no more surprises, and two of the gun-boats were detailed to guard the mortar-rafts until evening, when they were towed to a position where they would be under the protection of the fleet until morning. The constant explosion of the bombs in the fort or in the air, by which numbers of the garrison were killed. had its effect at last. The enemy saw that it was now only a matter of time, and that the Union forces must win in the end. The Confederate troops at Iuka, Corinth and other places in West Tennessee, were being gradually driven back, and once more the base of operations was to undergo a change in obedience to the law of strategy. Fort Pillow had to be evacuated, and when the Confederates did evacuate a position they generally did so with an unaccountable haste. In this case they may have heard that an army was marching on them from the rear, or that Pope was returning with a great force from Pittsburg Landing. Whatever it was, something ha
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
oceed in close order. On approaching Eastport, everything seemed quiet; and as there were no signs of troops or batteries on the hill commanding the landing, Lieutenant King signalled to the transports to land their troops, and took a position with the gunboats in the middle of the river, so as to cover the movement with their guns. The troops commenced disembarking immediately. Colonel Hoge then went on board the Key West, and informed Lieutenant King that he should move immediately for Iuka. As the Colonel was returning to the City of Pekin, a masked battery of six rifled guns from the hill at Eastport and three rifled guns from the Chickasaw opened on the boats. The transports were struck several times, and a caisson exploded on board both the Aurora and Kenton, setting them on fire. This caused great confusion among the troops, many of them jumping overboard from the burning steamers. A company that had been sent out as skirmishers immediately returned to the boats, while
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 59: (search)
tate.   Cotton, 44 bales 20,484 00 508 15 19,975 85 do Aug. 16, 1865 Quaker City.   Cotton, 90 bales 66,955 68 3,767 78 63,187 90 Philadelphia Aug. 21, 1865 Connecticut, Keystone State. Steamer Cora 6,140 00 861 03 5,278 97 New Orleans Aug. 21, 1865 Quaker City.   Cotton, 35 bales     17,575 20 New York Sept. 1, 1865 Governor Buckingham, Niphon.   Cotton, 156 sacks, etc.     15,150 00 do Sept. 1, 1865 Gettysburg. Schooner Comus 5,166 52 700 81 4,465 71 Key West Sept. 1, 1865 Iuka. Schooner Cora 32,697 53 3,157 78 29,539 75 do Sept. 1, 1865 Panola. Steamer Circassian 352,313 65 36,942 26 315,371 39 do Sept. 8, 1865 Somerset   Cotton, 80 bales     32,037 76 Philadelphia Sept. 22, 1865 Gettysburg, Keystone State, $620 counsel fees   Cotton, 52 bales 23,552 53 1,826 58 21,725 95 do Sept. 29, 1865 R. R. Cuyler.   Cotton, 82 bales 57,210 33 2,984 68 54,225 65 do Sept. 29, 1865 Aries. ($500 counsel fee deducted from captor's share.)   Cotton, 45 bale