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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 109 45 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 82 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 81 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 66 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 58 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 42 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 42 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) or search for Iuka (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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ur journey next day, reaching Corinth at night. I immediately ordered General Blair forward to Iuka with the First division, and as fast as I got troops up pushed them forward of Bear Creek, the brto about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the eighteenth, and to Iuka on the nineteenth of October. Osterihau's division was in the advance, constantly skirmishing assist us, had two gunboats up at Eastport under Captain Phelps, the very day after my arrival at Iuka, and Captain Phelps had a coal-barge decked over with which to cross horses and wagons before theeen devolved on me, with instructions, however, to retain command of the army in the field. At Iuka I made what appeared to me the best disposition of matters relating to this department, giving Geant floated down the Tennessee over the Muscle Shoals, landed at Tuscumbia, and was sent to me at Iuka. He bore a short message from the General to this effect: Drop all work on the Railroad ea
ven as well as did their former attempt. They find it very hard to catch our forces asleep, though they have many facilities for obtaining information. Our cavalry, under the command of the gallant Colonel Hatch, proves too formidable for the confederates. It is understood that a large part of Sherman's army is across the Tennessee. There has been no fighting except skirmishing by the advance force. His advance, by way of Tuscumbia, proves to have been only a feint, and he fell back to Iuka, and crossed over to the Tennessee at the nearest point. Another account. camp Second Iowa cavalry, Memphis, November 4, 1863. Editors Gazette: Times have been quite lively of late, with some fighting interspersed, in which the Second cavalry, as usual, had a share. The rebels, notwithstanding their recent defeat by Colonel Hatch's forces, when they undertook to break this line of railroad, seem not to have been satisfied without at least another trial. The Second is stationed