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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 55 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 10, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) or search for Jacinto (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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ter from Havana, under date of December 26, from which we make the following extract: I have been much pleased with the active diplomacy of Colonel Charles J. Helm, who, although a private gentleman residing here, having no official recognition, has effected wonders for the advantage and just appreciation of the South abroad. Some days before the departure of Slidell and Mason on the Trent, he told me in confidence that they would be taken off of that by vessel Wilkes of the San Jacinto, as my letters to you about that time indicated. I ridiculed the idea. His words were in confidence, as he said: "For the cause of the South it was better that they should be made prisoners by that violennce than to proceed safely on their mission"--for which reason he would not communicate the information he had obtained through his agents — but the morning of their departure, he told the guests at the hotel where he resides, that they certainly would be captured; that it had been