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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 57 57 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 27 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Oxford (Mississippi, United States) or search for Oxford (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
e reached. At the command forward every man is expected to rise and move forward at a double quick and with a yell. Every man is expected to do his duty. This short address, delivered under the gravest of circumstances, was impressive in the extreme, and well calculated to nerve up the men to do their best work. The words and manner of the speaker sank deep in my memory. How Captain Jones came to deliver this address is explained in a letter written by him to General Mahone from Oxford, Miss., under date of January 3, 1877: On getting my regiment in position in the ravine your courier delivered me a message to report to you at the right of the brigade. I went immediately, walking in front of the brigade, and found all of the other regimental commanders before you when I arrived. At that moment you gave the order to have the Georgia brigade moved up rapidly to its position on the right of the Virginia brigade, and then turning to the officers you delivered a stirring addr