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tteries, the operations were completely successful. The army crossed the river at Bruinsburgh. April thirtieth, turned Grand Gulf, and engaged the enemy near Port Gibson on the first, and at Fourteen Mile Creek on the third of May. The enemy was defeated in both engagements, with heavy loss. General Grant now moved his forces, by rapid marches, to the north, in order to separate the garrison of Vicksburgh from the covering arm of Johnston. This movement was followed by the battles of Raymond, May twelfth; of Jackson, May fourteenth; of Champion Hills, May sixteenth; and Big Black River Bridge, May twenty-seventh; in all of which our troops were victorious. General Grant now proceeded to invest Vicksburgh. A military and naval force was sent to Yazoo City on the thirteenth. It took three hundred prisoners, captured one steamer, burned five, took six cannon, two hundred and fifty small arms, and eight hundred horses and mules. No loss on our side reported. Small expedition
on that account, that they did not fight as bravely. Their bold attack upon Tunnel Hill drew upon them the concentrated might of half the rebel army, and, although some of them gave way in confusion, it was simply because they were assailed by overwhelming numbers. This was particularly the case with General John E. Smith's division. But they need not even this explanation at my hands. That the courage of the men and the ability of the officers who bore the American flag in triumph at Raymond, at Jackson, at Champion Hill, and at Vicksburgh, is no longer a matter of question. Tunnel Hill had been abandoned by the rebels in the night; and when I left the summit of the Ridge about noon, the right and left wings of our army were advancing, while the centre still held its position. No enemy was visible, but columns of smoke rising from various points told that the enemy was burning the bridges over the Chickamauga, and such of his stores as he could not carry away. Sherman was