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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 111 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 49 49 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 45 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 42 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 40 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 39 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 3 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 33 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) or search for Tupelo (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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es after the fall of Corinth, General Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio had been started some time before on its march eastward toward Chattanooga; and as this movement would be followed of course by a maneuvre on the part of the enemy, now (at Tupelo under General Braxton Bragg, either to meet Buell or frustrate his designs by some counteroperation, I was expected to furnish, by scouting and all other means available, information as to what was going on within the Confederate lines. To do thto impossible to identify the guilty, and so much crimination and acrimony grew out of the affair that it was deemed best to drop the whole matter. On August 27 about half of the command was absent reconnoitring, I having sent it south toward Tupelo, in the hope of obtaining some definite information regarding a movement to Holly Springs of the remainder of the Confederate army, under General Price, when about mid-day I was suddenly aroused by excited cries and sounds of firing, and I saw in