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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Woodville (Mississippi, United States) or search for Woodville (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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A Treacherous for. --The Woodville (Miss.) Republican has a correspondent with Gen. McCulloch's army, who was in the battle of Oak Hills, and from whose last letter we extract the following: I desire to mention in this postscript one fact connected with the operations of the enemy that ought to stamp them, not only with infamy, but cowardice, and cover the names of Gen. Lyon, Gen. Seigle, Col. Totten, and Capt. Sturges, of the U. S. Dragoons, with everlasting infamy. Throughout all the battle they displayed no colors over any position that they herd; in no line of battle formed, in no line of march, did the per ous wretches ever unfurl their much beloved Stars and Stripes, while in every regiment and on every part of the battle field waved the Confederate flag. Not once did the cowards fling to the breeze a banner that would indicate their nationality, but, on the contrary, deceived us by hoisting, on one or two occasions, when we pressed them close, a Confederate flag