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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) or search for St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 1: Louisiana. (search)
Chapter 1: Louisiana. St. Charles! Eighteen miles from New Orleans. Another hour! We try to catch the landscape as the pools and marshes, cedars and palmettoes slip behind us; but we try in vain to fix our minds on trifles by the way. A grove of orange trees, the fruit all burning ripe, arrests attention and provokes a cry of rapture; yet the coolest brain among us frets and flutters, for we know that we are driving towards a scene of strife, on which the eyes and hearts of forty millions of people are fixed in passionate hope and dread. President Grant affirms that anarchy reigns in Louisiana. No one doubts the fact; but General McEnery and the White citizens assert that this reign of anarchy was introduced by Grant, and is maintained in New Orleans for purposes of his own. This reign began, they say, two years ago, on the receipt by Stephen B. Packard of a telegram in these words : Washington, Department of Justice, Dec. 3, 1872. You are to enforce the decrees o
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 5: the State House. (search)
deserted corner of the town, from which the tides of life and trade have long since ebbed away. The stench reminds you of Dieppe, the dominoes and billiards of Bayonne. Yet this French quarter used to be a fashionable lounge, where ladies flirted, duellists fought, and senators ruled. The Rue St. Louis was an afternoon drive for belles and beaux, where sparkling Creoles ruined their admirers with a smile; but since that period fashions have changed, and everyone now lodges at the Hotel St. Charles. The once fashionable hotel has sunk into a State capital; one wing of the old hostelry being turned into an executive office, and a deserted dining-room into a legislative hall. By Kellogg's orders, planks are nailed across the doors and windows, and secured by iron stanchions. Barricades are thrown across St Louis Street, and the main entrance of the hotel is closed. One door — a back door in Royal Street — is left open. Inside and out the State House is strengthened to resist a