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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Saint James (Missouri, United States) or search for Saint James (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: little Sammy: the Civil War 1859-1863; aet. 40-44 (search)
t Williams Hall; hearing Parker speak of him warmly, she determined to attend his services. She found his preaching as unlike as possible to that of Theodore Parker. He had not the philosophic and militant genius of Parker, but he had a genius of his own, poetical, harmonizing. In after years I esteemed myself fortunate in having passed from the drastic discipline of the one to the tender and reconciling ministry of the other. She has much to say in the Reminiscences about the dear Saint James, as his friends loved to call him. The relation between them was close and affectionate: the Church of the Disciples became her spiritual home. These were the days of the Civil War; we must turn back to its opening year to record an episode of importance to her and to others. In the autumn of 1861 she went to Washington in company with Governor and Mrs. Andrew, Mr. Clarke and the Doctor, who was one of the pioneers of the Sanitary Commission, carrying his restless energy and indomit
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
Academy. To Chelsea, to call upon Mrs. Oscar Wilde.... He showed me with pride a fine boy of five years. We had some talk of old times, of his visit to America; I reminded him of the vermilion balcony at which he laughed. [Wilde had complained that the usual pronunciation of these words was prosaic.] June 30.... Mrs. Oscar Wilde asks us to take tea on Thursday; she has invited Walter Pater.... Have writ to James Bryce. July 2. To see Oscar Wilde's play, Lady Windermere's Fan, at St. James's Theatre. We went by invitation to his box, where were Lady Wilde and Mrs. Oscar. The play was perfectly acted, and is excellent of its kind, the motif not new, but the denouement original in treatment. After the play to call on Lady Rothschild, then to Constance Flower, Lady Battersea. who showed us her superb house full of treasures of art. July 4. Mrs. [Edmund] Gosse came and took us to Alma-Tadema's beautiful house and garden. He met us very cordially. Mrs. Smalley came. Sh