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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sarcoxie (Missouri, United States) or search for Sarcoxie (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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ck of water — ordered his men to press on in retreat from Carthage. A forced march was made to Sarcoxie, in the south-east corner of Jasper County, (Carthage being the county seat,) a distance of twee retreat was continued to Mount Vernon, in Lawrence County, sixteen or eighteen miles east of Sarcoxie, where Siegel took a stand, and where his Headquarters were located when Lieut. Tosk left, whic-house, was quickly shot down by our troops. Col. Siegel now found it necessary to retire to Sarcoxie, eight miles southwest of Carthage, as his ammunition was beginning to give out, and it was nee balance of our South-western army, concentrated at Mount Vernon and Springfield. The road to Sarcoxie passes around Carthage, and is covered by heavy woods, which it was Col. Siegel's object to gaie heat, and suffering intensely from thirst, Col. Siegel ordered his forces to press on towards Sarcoxie, where they arrived on Saturday morning. On Sunday afternoon the retreat was continued to Mount
t Expedition: Having arrived with my command in Sarcoxie, twenty-two miles from Neosho, on Friday, the 28th no reliable news. Scarcely had our troops left Sarcoxie, on the morning of the 29th, when I received news olomon, just then under march from Mount Vernon to Sarcoxie, to join the force under my command in Neosho, by n, to make a forward movement from Mount Vernon to Sarcoxie. I also ordered Captain Conrad, of Company B, (Ri secession hordes, and if necessary, to retreat to Sarcoxie. Company H, Captain Indest, was one of the two cogh Carthage, and occupy the eastern heights on the Sarcoxie road. Capt. Cramer, with two companies, (Indest amittingly. I therefore ordered a retreat toward Sarcoxie, under cover of both artillery and infantry. We fnd Carthage, and then again at the entrance of the Sarcoxie road into the woods, about two and a half miles soter place our troops advanced unmolested as far as Sarcoxie. Our whole loss in this engagement amounts to t
report which reached us at Springfield, gave rise to the belief that Gen. McCulloch designed an attack upon that point, by two columns moving from Cassville and Sarcoxie. The Federal scouts reported their force at about fifteen thousand in each division, and on Wednesday they were reported within twenty miles of the town and advd in front, whom he could not chase by reason of the precautions against surprises and flank movements — moreover, a large force of the enemy in the direction of Sarcoxie, and the necessity of keeping open his communication with Springfield — called a consultation with Brigadier-Generals Sweeney, Siegel; Majors Schofield, Shepherd. Hardly had the decision been declared, when one of the cavalry scouts announced that he had witnessed the departure of McCullough's camp in the direction of Sarcoxie, describing the train as long as that usually pertaining to an army of seven thousand men. On Sunday morning we retraced our steps, leaving Curran, Stone Co.,