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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley). You can also browse the collection for Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) or search for Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

t many unquestionably were left to believe that the Institution was Divine in its origin, and that it was still authorized by the Divine sanction. The hearts of men we may not be permitted to judge, but surely there is no law which forbids us to make a conscientious estimate of their heads; and he who, upon the strength of two or three little texts-upon the fact of the existence of Slavery among the Jews and in the Roman Empire-upon that small portion of history which records the curse upon Canaan, could assert, and in pulpit, newspaper, review, and volume, persist in the assertion that the Slavery of Four Millions of Men, in the Republic of the United States, in the year of Christianity One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty,--that such Slavery, utterly modern in its theory and practice, was a thing to be not merely justified, but applauded and defended in the pulpit-he, I say, who could make this large demand upon the faith of his neighbors, must have had one of those narrow and monki
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The Foresight of Mr. Fielder. (search)
Mr. Fielder the further justice to say, that he really does seem to consider Human Slavery to be altogether beautiful. It is evident that if he were not Fielder he would be a field-hand — if he were not a slave-owner he would be a slave. He does not seem to think that there is any material difference between the rapture of owning and the rapture of being owned. Slavery is sweet alike to his mental and his religious constitution. He duly lugs in the Holy Scriptures. He quotes, Cursed be Canaan! as if it had never been quoted before. We have short, biographical notices of Noah, Ham, Shem, Japheth, Abraham, Hagar, Jacob, our old friend Onesimus, and our old friend Philemon. One of his pages bristles with Biblical references: Gen. IX.; Lev. XIX., etc., etc. The dear old dou=los is again trotted out. The creature-comforts of Southern chattels are duly and admiringly dwelt upon. The blankets of the Black, his raiment, his pork and his pone when he is well, and his potions and pills
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Roundheads and Cavaliers. (search)
-extension, which the Northern States exhibit, is purely a Puritan feeling; for a deal of it is of old Dutch origin; and more of it has grown up in spite of Puritan predilection for a literal interpretation of, and a strong respect for, the Hebrew Scripture. The truth is, so far as the Scriptural argument is concerned, that the Puritanical spirits are at the South, and holding slaves there by virtue of perverted texts out of Genesis and Deuteronomy, and fine-spun theories about the curse of Canaan. The Puritan error, if such existed, happened to be precisely the error into which the philosophical and religious slaveholder always tumbles. He is the fanatic. He it is who, honestly perhaps, opposes his crude and interested convictions to the decision of the rest of the world. He it is who repeats a spectacle-too often, alas! exhibited — a spectacle of the fondness with which human nature clings to a delusion all the more fondly because it is a delusion. All the world knows that the
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Striking an Average. (search)
quired gentry. What will become of the Average of Mankind, poor fellow! then, and in those swampy regions, we can only guess; but we are disposed to think that there will be a rise in the whip-market of the Empire. It has been one of the chiefest causes of negro slavery in this country that it has demanded of the North, as well as the South, a general muddle of the human intellect, as the only safe, proper, constitutional cure of our complaint. This was natural, but none the less disgraceful. Thank God that at this end of the land at least, we shall hear no more, or not much more, of this dismal sophistry — this never-ending, still-recurring jangle of Inferior Races — of the Curse of Canaan — of the Compromises of the Constitution, of which nobody can give us the name and nature. The swift besom of war has swept away much of this rubbish, We stand more nearly upon the ground of solid truth than we have for half a century past. This is at least encouraging. October 22,
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Laughter in New Hampshire. (search)
plead the contagion of example. It is impossible to write of this Medical Momus in a serious way. Perhaps if we were to take a few lessons of him in the Art of Laughing — will he be good enough to send us a card of his terms for twelve lessons?--we, too, might see Slavery in a ludicrous light. Who knows but the Doctor might found a new Pro-Slavery sect? Some say that the institution is patriarchal, others affirm it to be ethnological. Others, still, find authority for it in the curse of Canaan. Now, might not Bachelder take the ground that, whereas, there is a time to laugh, so God gave us Slavery to laugh at — Slavery with its shames and crimes its cruelties and inconsistencies. When Sambo writhes under the lash, what can be droller? When his wife is cowhided, is there not entertainment in every scream? It is such a joke to part mother and child! It is such a perfection of comedy — this exhibition of human will, utterly depraved, and of human weakness, utterly down-trodden! <
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), What shall we do with them? (search)
ric telegraph, that, without the lash, all negroes are lazy. Some venerable Sambo, in confidence, imparts to a gaping letter-writer the fact, that he wishes to go back to his master, and we have leading columns occupied by delighted editors, who conclude from this wonderful premise that all other Sambos wish to go back to their masters also. Hard upon this follows another conclusion, namely, that upon being immediately restored to the bosom of Abraham, this curious descendant of accursed Canaan, unless properly flogged, will experience an inexplicable revulsion of feelings will murder his master and fire his master's house. It appears to us astonishing, that the Civil War, which is not only such a sombre but such a serious business, and which demands of the best mind of the nation such careful and practical judgment, should have led to no wiser reflection. We have had all this before. For a quarter of a century we have been compelled to listen to the same bold assertion and to t