hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) or search for Canaan, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
s, shrieking, fled From the metamorphosed figure. ‘Look there!’ they said, “the Old Stone Head Himself is turning nigger!” The schoolhouse, The academy at Canaan, N. H., received one or two colored scholars, and was in consequence dragged off into a swamp by Democratic teams. out of Canaan hauled Seemed turning on its track agCanaan hauled Seemed turning on its track again, And like a great swamp-turtle crawled To Canaan village back again, Shook off the mud and settled flat Upon its underpinning; A nigger on its ridge-pole sat, From ear to ear a-grinning. Gray H——d heard oa nights the sound Of rail-cars onward faring; Right over Democratic ground The iron horse came tearing. A flag waved o'erCanaan village back again, Shook off the mud and settled flat Upon its underpinning; A nigger on its ridge-pole sat, From ear to ear a-grinning. Gray H——d heard oa nights the sound Of rail-cars onward faring; Right over Democratic ground The iron horse came tearing. A flag waved o'er that spectral train, As high as Pittsfield steeple; Its emblem was a broken chain; Its motto: ‘To the people! ’ I dreamed that Charley took his bed, With Hale for his physician; His daily dose an old “unread And unreferred” petition. ‘Papers and memorials touching the subject of slavery shall be laid on the t
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Notes (search)
shire Legislature, for the reason that the newspaper organ of that sect and its leading preachers favored abolition. Note 5, page 118. The senatorial editor of the Belknap Gazette all along manifested a peculiar horror of niggers and nigger parties. Note 6, page 118. The justice before whom Elder Storrs was brought for preaching abolition on a writ drawn by Hon. M. N., Jr., of Pittsfield. The sheriff served the writ while the elder was praying. Note 7, page 118. The academy at Canaan, N. H., received one or two colored scholars, and was in consequence dragged off into a swamp by Democratic teams. Note 8, page 119. Papers and memorials touching the subject of slavery shall be laid on the table without reading, debate, or reference. So read the gag-law, as it was called, introduced in the House by Mr. Atherton. Note 9, page 120. The Female Anti-Slavery Society, at its first meeting in Concord, was assailed with stones and brickbats. Note 10, page 168. The election o