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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 13, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 4 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Amsterdam (New York, United States) or search for Amsterdam (New York, United States) in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
ections; but the last step, the change from life to death, is so sudden, so great, that there is no proper preparation for it. I felt as if it were unexpected, when I read your letter this morning. The blood rushed to my head as if I had then received the first intimation of his danger. God's will be done. I shall have few losses to bear, that will reach so far in their consequences. Mr. Haven's attachment to Mr. Ticknor is expressed in a letter to Miss Eliza Buckminster, written at Amsterdam, July 24, 1815, when Mr. Haven was twenty-five and Mr. Ticknor twenty-four years old. He says: Ticknor is happier than I thought he ever could be when absent from home; but his feelings are so entirely under the control of his reason, his mind is so perfectly regulated and balanced, that he will always be happy when discharging what he believes to be his duty. An intimate acquaintance of six years, in which I have treated him with the confidence of a brother, and have received from him fa