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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Camillus (New York, United States) or search for Camillus (New York, United States) in all documents.

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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 1, line 158 (search)
taken, such as are the doom Of potent nations: and when fortune poured Through Roman gates the booty of a world, The curse of luxury, chief bane of states, Fell on her sons. Farewell the ancient ways! Behold the pomp profuse, the houses decked With ornament; their hunger loathed the food Of former days; men wore attire for dames Scarce fitly fashioned; poverty was scorned, Fruitful of warriors; and from all the world Came that which ruins nations; while the fields Furrowed of yore by great Camillus' plough, Or by the mattock which a Curius held, Lost their once narrow bounds, and widening tracts By hinds unknown were tilled. No nation this To sheathe the sword, with tranquil peace content And with her liberties; but prone to ire; Crime holding light as though by want compelled: Great was the glory in the minds of men, Ambition lawful even at point of sword, To rise above their country: might their law: Decrees were forced from Senate and from Plebs: Consul and Tribune broke the laws a
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 6, line 750 (search)
ly: 'Called from the margin of the silent stream I saw no fateful sisters spin the threads. 'Yet know I this, that 'mid the Roman shades 'Reigns fiercest discord; and this impious war 'Destroys the peace that ruled the fields of death. 'Elysian meads and deeps of Tartarus 'In paths diverse the Roman chieftains leave 'And thus disclose the fates. The blissful ghosts Bear visages of sorrow. Sire and son 'The Decii, who gave themselves to death 'In expiation of their country's doom, 'And great Camillus, wept; and Sulla's shade 'Complained of fortune. Scipio bewailed 'The scion of his race about to fall ' In sands of Libya: Cato, greatest foe ' To Carthage, grieves for that indignant soul ' Which shall disdain to serve. Brutus alone ' In all the happy ranks I smiling saw, ' First consul when the kings were thrust from Rome. ' The chains were fallen from boastful Catiline. ' Him too I saw rejoicing, and the pair ' Of Marii, and Cethegus' naked arm.See Book II., 611. ' The Drusi, heroes of t