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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 6 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 3 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 31, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Canandaigua (New York, United States) or search for Canandaigua (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 9 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-Masonic party. (search)
Anti-Masonic party. In 1826 William Morgan, a citizen of western New York, announced his intention to publish a book in which the secrets of freemasonry were to be disclosed. It was printed at Batavia, N. Y. On Sept. 11 Morgan was seized at Batavia, upon a criminal charge, by a company of men who came from Canandaigua. He was taken to that place, tried and acquitted on the criminal charge, but was immediately arrested on a civil process for a trifling debt. He was cast into jail there, and the next night was discharged by those who procured his arrest, taken from prison at nine o'clock at night, and at the door was seized and thrust into a carriage in waiting, which was driven rapidly towards Rochester. He was taken by relays of horses, by the agency of several individuals, to Fort Niagara, at the mouth of the Niagara River, and deposited in the powder magazine there. It was known that the freemasons had made violent attempts to suppress Morgan's announced book, and this out
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Folger, Charles James 1818-1884 (search)
Folger, Charles James 1818-1884 Jurist; born in Nantucket, Mass., April 16, 1818; graduated at Geneva (now Hobart) College in 1836; studied law in Canandaigua, N. Y.; was admitted to the bar in Albany in 1839; and returned to Geneva to practise in 1840. He was judge of the court of common pleas in Ontario county in 1843-46, and was county judge in 1852– Charles James Folger. 56. Shortly after the formation of the Republican party he left the Democrats and joined the new organization. He served as State Senator in 1861-69; for four years of that period he was president pro tem., and during the whole period was chairman of the judiciary committee. In 1869-70 he was United States assistant treasurer in New York City; in 1871 was elected associate judge of the New York Court of Appeals; and in 1880 became chief-justice. In November of the latter year he was re-elected to the Court of Appeals, but resigned in 1881 to accept the office of Secretary of the United States Treasury.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Granger, Gideon 1767-1822 (search)
Granger, Gideon 1767-1822 Statesman; born in Suffield, Conn., July 19, 1767; graduated at Yale College in 1787; became a lawyer; Postmaster-General in 1801-14. His publications include a Fourth of July oration, and Political essays. He died in Canandaigua, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1822.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holley, Orville Luther 1791-1861 (search)
Holley, Orville Luther 1791-1861 Editor; born in Salisbury, Conn., May 19, 1791; graduated at Harvard in 1813; studied law and practised in Hudson, Canandaigua, and New York City. He was editor of the Anti-Masonic magazine, Troy Sentinel, the Ontario repository, the Albany Daily Advertiser, and the State register; was surveyor-general of the State in 1838; and author of Description of the City of New York; and Life of Franklin. He died in Albany, N. Y., March 25, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howe, William Wirt 1833- (search)
Howe, William Wirt 1833- Lawyer; born in Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1833; served in the Union army during the Civil War; studied law and practised in New Orleans, La.; and became judge of the chief criminal court of New Orleans, and associate justice of the Supreme Court of Louisiana. He is author of Municipal history of New Orleans; and Studies in the Civil law.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phelps, Oliver 1749-1809 (search)
the Massachusetts commissary department. In 1788 he, with Nathaniel Gorham, purchased a large tract of land (2,200,000 acres) in the State of New York, and at Canandaigua opened the first land-office established in America. In 1795 he and William Hart bought the Connecticut Western Reserve, in Ohio, comprising 3,300,000 acres. MAmerica. In 1795 he and William Hart bought the Connecticut Western Reserve, in Ohio, comprising 3,300,000 acres. Mr. Phelps afterwards settled with his family at Canandaigua, then a wilderness; represented that district in Congress from 1803 to 1805; and was judge of a circuit court. He died in Canandaigua, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1809.merica. In 1795 he and William Hart bought the Connecticut Western Reserve, in Ohio, comprising 3,300,000 acres. Mr. Phelps afterwards settled with his family at Canandaigua, then a wilderness; represented that district in Congress from 1803 to 1805; and was judge of a circuit court. He died in Canandaigua, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1809.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, Peter Buel 1773-1844 (search)
Porter, Peter Buel 1773-1844 Military officer; born in Salisbury, Conn., Aug. 4, 1773; studied law, and began practice at Canandaigua, N. Y., in 1795; was a member of Congress from 1809 to 1813, and again in 1815-16. He settled at Black Rock, near General Porter's medal. Buffalo, where he and his brothers made large purchases of land along the Niagara River. A leader of volunteers on the Niagara frontier, he became distinguished for his skill and bravery, and received the thanks of Congress and a gold medal. President Madison offered him the position Peter Buel, Porter. of commander-in-chief of the army in 1815, which he declined. He was secretary of state of New York (1815-16), and was Secretary of War, under President John Quincy Adams, in 1828. General Porter was one of the early projectors of the Erie Canal, and one of the first board of commissioners. He died at Niagara Falls, March 20, 1844.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
During the debate on the Panama congress in the Senate, John Randolph refers to the coalition of Adams and Clay as that of the Puritan and the blackleg. A duel followed between Clay and Randolph......April 8, 1826 First session adjourns......May 22, 1826 John Adams, born in Braintree, Mass., Oct. 19, 1735, and Thomas Jefferson, born in Monticello, Va., April 2, 1743, die on the fiftieth anniversary of American independence......July 4, 1826 Abduction of William Morgan from Canandaigua, N. Y.......Sept. 12, 1826 [Gave rise to a political party—the anti-Masonic—that became national in importance, though short-lived.] Convention with Great Britain concerning indemnities for the War of 1812-14......Nov. 13, 1826 Second session convenes......Dec. 4, 1826 Congress makes an appropriation for the payment of Revolutionary and other pensions......Jan. 29, 1827 Nineteenth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1827 General Gaines ordered into the Creek Indian country......
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, (search)
ncellor Livingston in the balcony of the City Hall.] First recorded party contest in New York State; votes polled, 12,453......1789 Oliver Phelps opens in Canandaigua the first private land office in America......1789 United States buys of Stephen Moore the site of West Point......1790 Population of the State, 340,120..the Hudson, and reaches New York City. Grand celebration......Nov. 4, 1825 Delaware and Hudson Canal commenced......1826 Abduction of William Morgan from Canandaigua......Sept. 12, 1826 Thurlow Weed edits the Anti-masonic Enquirer, at Rochester, N. Y.......1826-27 Owing to Morgan's abduction, a county convention at Le tional guard from New York, Brooklyn, and elsewhere, about 8,000 men, ordered to Buffalo by Governor Flower......Aug. 17, 1892 Ex-Gov. Myron H. Clark dies at Canandaigua, aged eighty-six......Aug. 23, 1892 Switchmen's strike at Buffalo declared off by Grand-master Sweeney......Aug. 24, 1892 George William Curtis, born 1824