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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 115 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jamestown, N. Y. (New York, United States) or search for Jamestown, N. Y. (New York, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
amestown Tercentennial Exposition, Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: In an address at a memorial meeting when General Fitz Lee died, I said: He fell with his harness on, overtaxed by the strenuous work he had done to make the coming Jamestown celebration a grand success. Ulysses has gone to the Hesperides and there is none left in Ithaca to bend his matchless bow. There is reason to suppose if General Albert Sidney Johnston had not been mortally wounded as he was riding forwaween the sections became more cordial, and the people more united by the bonds of mutual respect and friendship than they had been for more than half a century. These were the considerations and factors which made him the man of the hour for Jamestown. His bugle-call would have been heard along the mountain sides, through the valleys, across the vast plains, along the rivers and by the sounding sea. It would have been as the shout of Achilles from the ramparts. Fitz Lee was rather a live
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
d to be left there. Captain Terrill, who was shot through both legs, did not recover from his wounds until several years after the war was over. April 19, 1862, Colonel Chenault wrote from Monticello to General Morgan as follows: I hasten to give you all the news we have. There is a rumor here that our forces have been attacked at Big Creek Gap, whether true or not, I do not know. Captain Joseph Chenault has just got in from a scout across the river; he crossed at Creelsburg, went to Jamestown, recrossed at Rowena, found no enemy nor heard of any. Colonel J. J. Morrison has moved his command to Albany, which leaves us a very long and heavy picket duty to perform—from the mouth of South Fork to Burkesville, but with the assistance of Major Bullock I hope to be able to hold the enemy in check. Captain Chenault was within a short distance of Burksville, heard of no force there. There are three regiments (Union) at Columbia. There is, beyond doubt, a large force on the north side