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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Camp Upton (New York, United States) or search for Camp Upton (New York, United States) in all documents.

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t was possible to cover the rear of the column then scattered on the road. Two miles or less this side of Vienna, Col. Cook, with the main body of his regiment, turned upon the road leading to the Chain Bridge over the Potomac, thinking it might be a better way, and at the same time afford, by the presence of a large and organized body, protection to any stragglers that might have taken that route. Lieutenant-Colonel Mason, with the Second Ohio, marched in by the way of Fall's Church and Camp Upton. The return of the Ohio regiments to Washington was made necessary by the fact that their term of service having expired, they are at once to be sent home, to be mustered out of service. Not having been able to obtain yet complete or satisfactory returns of all the casualties in the battle, in the different corps of my brigade, I shall reserve the list of them for a separate report, which I will furnish as soon as practicable. I am very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Robert
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 60 1/2.-Gen. Schenck's defence. (search)
Doc. 60 1/2.-Gen. Schenck's defence. camp Upton, Va., Tuesday, June 25, 1861. I find in the telegrams of the 22d inst., the following special despatch: A strict examination of the causes of the lamentable affair at Vienna, has resulted in the exculpation of the engineer of the train which took up the Ohio troops. The responsibility of the blunder which resulted so disastrously for our troops, rests upon Gen. Schenck. Now that you have published the above, will you do Gen. Schenck the justice to publish also this communication? I was at the time acting aid to Gen. Schenck, and at his side both upon and during the action, and have full knowledge, therefore, of every order given. The First Ohio Regiment were taken on a train furnished by Gen. McDowell, and pursuant to his orders. Six companies were left at different points along the line of the Loudon and Hampshire Railroad. The four remaining companies were to be stationed at Vienna. This same train had only the