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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 29 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 9 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for South Mills (North Carolina, United States) or search for South Mills (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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termined to advance, trusting to Providence and the country for the subsistence of his men. Encamping that night at South-Mills, the column was started the next morning in the direction of Camden Court-House. The region abounded in agricultural bitants being almost exclusively secesh, the colored boys were allowed to forage at will along the road. Returning to South-Mills, General Wild sent his train of contrabands, numbering seventy-five wagons, under guard to Portsmouth. A battery of awls and the crying of wildcats. For two hours we rode through the Stygian blackness of the forest, when we arrived at South-Mills — a collection of about twenty houses — where we stopped to rest our horses. Here we left the canal and descended int The Pasquotank guerrillas had fought shy of the armed niggers, invariably skeddadling at their approach; but as these of Camden seemed more bold and numerous, General Wild determined to return to Sandy Hook, and ascertain if the State defenders were