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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
ed him to escape capture. It was the omission or indifference of the Navy Department in not sending proper vessels to the right localities. Many foreign ships passed along this. route; but Americans had, in a measure, taken the alarm, and were pursuing longer and safer lines of travel. Still Semmes was amply repaid for watching at the tollgate, even though many passed through without paying toll. He captured the ship Washington from the Chincha Islands with a cargo of guano, bound to Antwerp. Finding difficulties in the way of destroying her neutral cargo. he put his prisoners on board, and let her go on a ransom-bond. The fact was, he was anxious to get rid of his prisoners who were eating him out of house and home. On the morning of the 1st of March the Alabama captured the fine ship John A. Parks, of Hallowell, Maine. Her cargo, consisting of lumber for Montevideo, was. covered by the seals of the British consul, and was as neutral as any cargo could be. But the ship
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
Confederate cruisers against the United States. It would have perhaps been better policy for the United States to have declared war with Great Britain than to have submitted longer to open violations of neutrality, for the former had little commerce to lose and could have swept the trade of the latter from the ocean. When Mr. Adams heard that the Georgia was sold to a British merchant, he informed Commodore Thomas T. Craven, then in command of the U. S. S. Niagara, lying in the port of Antwerp, that he must endeavor to intercept and capture the converted Confederate. The Georgia was captured by Commodore Craven off Lisbon, was sent to Boston and condemned by the Admiralty Court, her alleged owner never receiving a penny of the £ 15,000 he had paid into the Confederate treasury as the price of the vessel. The fate of the Nashville has already been mentioned. In January and February, 1863, several attempts were made to destroy her as she lay above Fort McAllister, on the Great