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information, the sources of which you will not expect me to disclose, that Mr. Covas had been engaged in buying confederate notes, giving for them sterling exchange, thus transferring abroad the credit of the States in the rebellion, and enabling these bills of credit to be converted into bullion to be used there, as it has been, for the purpose of purchasing arms and munitions of war. That Mr. Covas was one of, and the agent of, an association or company of Greek merchants residing here, in London, and at Havana, who had set apart a large fund for this enterprise. That these confederate notes so purchased by Mr. Covas, had been used in the purchase of sugars and cotton, of which the sugars in question, in value almost two hundred thousand dollars, are a part. I directed Mr. Covas to hold these sugars until this matter could be investigated. I am satisfied of the substantial truth of this information. Mr. Covas's own books will show the important facts that he sold sterling exc
e the key to the Southern Confederacy. Virginians, Marylanders, ye who have rallied to her defence, would it not be better to fall in her streets than to basely abandon them, and view from the surrounding hills the humiliation of the capital of the Southern Confederacy? To die in her streets would be bliss to this, and to fall where tyrants strode would be to consecrate the spot anew and wash it of every stain. . . . . The loss of Richmond in Europe would sound like the loss of Paris or London, and the moral effect will scarcely be less. Let us, therefore, avert the great disaster by a reliance on ourselves. It is better that Richmond should fall as the capital of the Confederacy, than that Richmond exist the depot of the hireling horde of the North. But Richmond can be defended, and saved from pollution. The fate of the capital of the Confederacy rests with the people. The next few days may decide the fate of Richmond. It is either to remain the capital of the Confederacy
e the key to the Southern Confederacy. Virginians, Marylanders, ye who have rallied to her defence, would it not be better to fall in her streets than to basely abandon them, and view from the surrounding hills the humiliation of the capital of the Southern Confederacy? To die in her streets would be bliss to this, and to fall where tyrants strode would be to consecrate the spot anew and wash it of every stain. . . . . The loss of Richmond in Europe would sound like the loss of Paris or London, and the moral effect will scarcely be less. Let us, therefore, avert the great disaster by a reliance on ourselves. It is better that Richmond should fall as the capital of the Confederacy, than that Richmond exist the depot of the hireling horde of the North. But Richmond can be defended, and saved from pollution. The fate of the capital of the Confederacy rests with the people. The next few days may decide the fate of Richmond. It is either to remain the capital of the Confederacy