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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 26 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthydemus, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno 2 0 Browse Search
Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (ed. William Ellery Leonard) 2 0 Browse Search
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Hercules (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Hercules (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 7, line 350 (search)
covered by the overwhelming sea— and so escaped Deucalion's flood, uncrowned. She passed by Pittane upon the left, with its huge serpent-image of hard stone, and also passed the grove called Ida's, where the stolen bull was changed by Bacchus' power into a hunted stag—in that same vale Paris lies buried in the sand; and over fields where Mera warning harked, Medea flew; over the city of Eurypylus upon the Isle of Cos, whose women wore the horns of cattle when from there had gone the herd of Hercules; and over Rhodes beloved of Phoebus, where Telchinian tribes dwelt, whose bad eyes corrupting power shot forth;— Jove, utterly despising, thrust them deep beneath his brother's waves; over the walls of old Carthaea, where Alcidamas had seen with wonder a tame dove arise from his own daughter's body. And she saw the lakes of Hyrie in Teumesia's Vale, by swans frequented—There to satisfy his love for Cycnus, Phyllius gave two living vultures: shell for him subdued a lion, and delivered it to
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 9, line 172 (search)
were safe, reclining on a banquet-couch. And now on every side the spreading flames were crackling fiercely, as they leaped from earth upon the careless limbs of Hercules. He scorned their power. The Gods felt fear for earth's defender and their sympathy gave pleasure to Saturnian Jove — he knew their thought—and joyfully he said protection: your concern may justly evidence his worth, whose deeds great benefits bestowed. Let not vain thoughts alarm you, nor the rising flames of Oeta; for Hercules who conquered everything, shall conquer equally the spreading fires which now you see: and all that part of him, celestial — inherited of me— immortal, cannot fedeep vexation was not wholly hid, when Jupiter with his concluding words so plainly hinted at her jealous mind. Now, while the Gods conversed, the mortal part of Hercules was burnt by Mulciber; but yet an outline of a spirit-form remained. Unlike the well-known mortal shape derived by nature of his mother, he kept traces only of
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 9, line 273 (search)
her old age and her fears, could pass the weary hours with Iole in garrulous narrations of his worth, his mighty labors and her own sad days. Iole, by command of Hercules, had been betrothed to Hyllus, and by him was gravid, burdened with a noble child. And so to Iole, Alcmena told this story of the birth of Hercules:— “Ah, may thHercules:— “Ah, may the Gods be merciful to you and give you swift deliverance in that hour when needful of all help you must call out for Ilithyia, the known goddess of all frightened mothers in their travail, she whom Juno's hatred overcame and made so dreadful against me. For, when my hour of bearing Hercules was very near, and when the tenth sign oHercules was very near, and when the tenth sign of the zodiac was traversed by the sun, my burden then became so heavy, and the one I bore so large, you certainly could tell that Jove must be the father of the unborn child. “At last, no longer able to endure— ah me, a cold sweat seizes on me now; only to think of it renews my pains! Seven days in agony, as many nights, exha
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 9, line 324 (search)
branches kept the warmth of her lost body, so transformed.” And all the while that Iole told this, tearful in sorrow for her sister's fate, Alcmena weeping, tried to comfort her. But as they wept together, suddenly a wonderful event astonished them; for, standing in the doorway, they beheld the old man Iolaus, known to them, but now transformed from age to youth, he seemed almost a boy, with light down on his cheeks: for Juno's daughter Hebe, had renewed his years to please her husband, Hercules. Just at the time when ready to make oath, she would not grant such gifts to other men— Themis had happily prevented her. “For even now,” she said, “a civil strife is almost ready to break forth in Thebes, and Capaneus shall be invincible to all save the strong hand of Jove himself; and there two hostile brothers shall engage in bloody conflict; and Amphiaraus shall see his own ghost, deep in yawning earth. “His own son, dutiful to him, shall be both just and unjust in a single deed; f
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 11, line 708 (search)
hin he struck his breast again and again. At last he roused himself from gloom and slumber; and, while raised upon his elbow, he enquired of Iris why she came to him.—He knew her by her name. She answered him, “O, Sleep, divine repose of all things! Gentlest of the deities! Peace to the troubled mind, from which you drive the cares of life, restorer of men's strength when wearied with the toils of day, command a vision that shall seem the actual form of royal Ceyx to visit Trachin famed for Hercules and tell Halcyone his death by shipwreck. It is Juno's wish.” Iris departed after this was said. For she no longer could endure the effect of slumber-vapor; and as soon as she knew sleep was creeping over her tired limbs she flew from there—and she departed by the rainbow, over which she came before. Out of the multitude—his thousand sons— the god of sleep raised Morpheus by his power. Most skillful of his sons, who had the art of imitating any human shape; and dexterously could imitat
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 12, line 536 (search)
Nestor had hardly told this marvellous tale of bitter strife betwixt the Lapithae and those half-human, vanquished Centaurs, when Tlepolemus, incensed because no word of praise was given to Hercules, replied in this way; “Old sir, it is very strange, you have neglected to say one good word in praise of Hercules. My father told me often, that he overcame in battle those cloud born centaurs.” Nestor, very loth, replied, “Why force me to recall old wrongs, to uncover sorrow buried by the years,Hercules. My father told me often, that he overcame in battle those cloud born centaurs.” Nestor, very loth, replied, “Why force me to recall old wrongs, to uncover sorrow buried by the years, that made me hate your father? It is true his deeds were wonderful beyond belief, heaven knows, and filled the earth with well earned praise which I should rather wish might be denied. Deiphobus, the wise Polydamas, and even great Hector get no praise from me. Your father, I recall once overthrew Messene's walls and with no cause destroyed Elis and Pylos and with fire and sword ruined my own loved home. I cannot name all whom he killed. But there were twelve of us, the sons of Neleus and all
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 15, line 1 (search)
given—: all cast into the cruel urn were black! Soon as that urn inverted poured forth all the pebbles to be counted, every one was changed completely from its black to white, and so the vote adjudged him innocent. By that most fortunate aid of Hercules he was exempted from the country's law. “Myscelus, breathing thanks to Hercules, with favoring wind sailed on the Ionian sea, past Sallentine Neretum, Sybaris, Spartan Tarentum, and the Sirine Bay, Crimisa, and on beyond the Iapygian fields. TheHercules, with favoring wind sailed on the Ionian sea, past Sallentine Neretum, Sybaris, Spartan Tarentum, and the Sirine Bay, Crimisa, and on beyond the Iapygian fields. Then, skirting shores which face these lands, he found the place foretold the river Aesar's mouth, and found not far away a burial mound which covered with its soil the hallowed bones of Croton.—There, upon the appointed land, he built up walls—and he conferred the name of Croton, who was there entombed, on his new city, which has ever since been called Crotona.” By tradition it is known such strange deeds caused that city to be built, by men of Greece upon the Italia