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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 26 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthydemus, Protagoras, Gorgias, Meno 2 0 Browse Search
Lucretius, De Rerum Natura (ed. William Ellery Leonard) 2 0 Browse Search
Phaedrus, The Fables of Phaedrus (ed. Christopher Smart, Christopher Smart, A. M.) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Hercules (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Hercules (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 2 (search)
l manner. DÆM. looking out at the side. O ye immortal Gods, Sceparnio, what means those people near the sea-shore? SCEPARNIO According to my notion, they've been invited to a parting breakfastTo a parting breakfast: "Prandium propter viam." Thornton has the following Note here: "This is a sorry joke, even for Sceparnio, on so serious and melancholy an occasion, and cannot be well expressed in our tongue. When the ancients were about to undertake any voyage, they used to make a sacrifice to Hercules before they set off, which was for that reason called 'propter viam;' and the custom was to burn all they didn't eat. Wherefore Sceparnio says 'laverunt,' which signifies 'they have consumed their all' as well as they have bathed.' alluding to the ship being lost.". DÆM. How so? SCEPARNIO Why, because, after dinner, I fancy, they yesterday washed themselves clean; their ship has gone to pieces out at sea. DÆM. looking steadfastly. Such is the fact. SCEPARNIO But, i' faith, on dry land our
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 4 (search)
resembling the colour of an eagle. By mistake, he happens to mention "a vulture," and immediately corrects himself, as, from its sordid habits, he may be deemed to be paying her an ill compliment.,--rather, the eagle's, indeed, I meant to say. Her breasts, too, how beautiful; and then what expression on her lips! Takes hold of her. AMPELISCA struggling. I'm no common commodity for the whole townshipNo common commodity for the whole township: "Pollucta pago." The portion of the sacrifice to Hercules which was given to the common people was said to be "pollucta," whence the present adaptation of the epithet. Echard seems to have contemplated translating this, "I'm no pie for every one's cutting up!"; can't you keep your hands off me? SCEPARNIO patting her. Won't you let me touch you, gentle one, in this manner, gently and lovingly? * * * * * * * * AMPELISCA When I have leisure, then I'll be giving my attention to toying and dalliance to please you; for the present, prithee, do either sa
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 5 (search)
nto his house. LABRAX O rare, by my troth, the Temple here is surely changed all of a sudden; this is now the Temple of HerculesTemple of Hercules: Seeing the servants with their cudgels, he is reminded of Hercules, who was thus depicted, and was cHercules: Seeing the servants with their cudgels, he is reminded of Hercules, who was thus depicted, and was called by the Poets "Claviger." which was that of Venus before; in such fashion has the old fellow planted two statues here with clubs. I' faith, I don't know now whither in the world I shall fly from here; so greatly are they both raging now against following Note on this passage: "This 'Palæstra' was a place of public exercise, over the gate of which was a statue of Hercules, with an inscription 'Palæstra;' now Labrax, finding this stout fellow with his club, whom before he had compared to HerHercules, answering instead of Palæstra, he wittily alludes to that statue, and says that that Palæstra was none of his." Thornton appears to be right in considering this a far-fetched conceit on the part of the fair Commentatress. that answers. Harkye,