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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Polybius, Histories. You can also browse the collection for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Polybius, Histories, book 11, Carthaginians Driven From Spain (search)
thered in the air, and a violent and prolonged torrent of rain descended, under which the Romans with difficulty effected a return to their own camp. . . . Many Romans lost their lives by the fire inThe Romans in the mining district of Spain. trying to get the silver and gold which had been melted and fused. . . . Scipio on the Expulsion of the Carthaginians from Spain in Consequence of the Above Victory When every one complimented Scipio after he hadScipio's idea of transferring the war to Africa. driven the Carthaginians from Iberia, and advised him straightway to take some rest and ease, as having put a period to the war, he answered that he "congratulated them on their sanguine hopes; for himself he was now more than ever revolving in his mind how to begin the war with Carthage. Up to that time the Carthaginians had waged war upon the Romans; but that now fortune put it in the power of the Romans to make war upon them. . . ." Scipio's Visit to Syphax, King of Masaesylians See Liv