hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 110 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 18 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 66 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 62 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 1 document section:

formation. Here I received the earliest tidings of the General's successful ride through Pennsylvania, the capture of Chambersburg, and his great seizure of horses, and also learned that our daring band of horsemen was already on its rapid return to my approach, and the proximity of his forces, would enable him to prevent my capturing it. I therefore turned towards Chambersburg. I did not reach this point till after dark in a rain. I did not deem it safe to defer the attack till morning; nor ive machine-shops and depot buildings of the railroad and several trains of loaded cars were entirely destroyed. From Chambersburg I decided, after mature consideration, to strike for the vicinity of Leesburg as the best route of return, particularleons in the North. One or two of my men lost their way, and are probably in the hands of the enemy. I marched from Chambersburg to Leesburg, 90 miles, with only one hour's halt, in thirty-six hours, including a forced passage of the Potomac — a m