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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 110 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 18 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 66 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 62 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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unter's successful March and subsequent retreat General Jubal A. Early threatens Washington Chambersburg. Pa. Burned selected to operate against General Early the Shenandoah Valley the Confedera recrossing this stream, he advanced again into Maryland, and sending McCausland on to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, laid that town in ashes, leaving three thousand non-combatants without shelter or foof the Confederate capital. This second irruption of Early and his ruthless destruction of Chambersburg led to many recommendations on the part of General Grant looking to a speedy elimination of te Administration to approve this measure, but finally the manoeuvres of Early and the raid to Chambersburg compelled a partial compliance, though Grant had somewhat circumvented the difficulty alreadyon of Averell's cavalry, which had followed McCausland toward Moorefield after the burning of Chambersburg, were all in motion toward Halltown on August 6. Affairs at Monocacy kept me but an hour