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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 110 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 82 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 18 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 66 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 62 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 62 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 43 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Chambersburg, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

vention was earnestly made and did not go unheeded. First among the military operations to support the secession of these counties from Virginia were those in the two great neighboring States of Pennsylvania and Ohio. The conference between the vigorous governor of Pennsylvania and President Lincoln, on April 12, 1861, which encouraged the President in making his call for troops, was followed by the rapid military organization of the State and the stationing of large bodies of troops at Chambersburg under Patterson, and at other points from which invasion could be made into Maryland and across any part of the eastern border of Virginia. The State of Ohio passed an act to enroll the militia of that State on April 12th, providing for immediately mustering and arming its volunteers. These active preparations were made before Virginia had seceded, and even before the attempt to reinforce Fort Sumter had failed. Then followed the ample answer to President Lincoln's call for troops,
to the Gauley along the main lines of travel. For lack of subsistence, Echols withdrew to the Princeton and Lewisburg line, and Jenkins was ordered into Greenbrier and Pocahontas counties. This was the situation as winter came on in 1862, practically the same as in the previous year at that season. In the Northeast there had been active operations fol-. lowing the battle of Sharpsburg and Lee's occupation of the lower Shenandoah valley. A few days before Stuart set out on his famous Chambersburg raid around Mc-Clellan's army, Col. J. D. Imboden had made an attempt to destroy the Cheat river bridge, but was prevented by the daring of a Union woman, who rode 25 miles through the woods to warn the enemy. He next made a raid to Romney, seized the town and scouted toward the railroad, drawing a party of the enemy into ambush. He reported, We unhorsed fifteen of the rascals, wounding several; captured two unhurt, and horses and arms. He had now about 900 men, but only 600 armed, and
ucceeded to command, claiming that soldiers and citizens alike fired from the houses. The railroad was torn up slightly, and Franklin then retreated, harassed by the Confederate cavalry, by way of Abb's valley and Flat Top mountain. In May, General Jenkins' brigade had been ordered into the Shenandoah valley, and in June many West Virginians accompanied him with Ewell's corps into Pennsylvania, fighting at Bunker Hill and Martinsburg in the defeat of Milroy, and leading the advance to Chambersburg, whence they proceeded almost to Harrisburg before the concentration was made at Gettysburg. There they fought gallantly, and on the retreat, under command of Colonel Ferguson, Jenkins having been wounded, were one of the two brigades under the immediate command of Stuart, moving by way of Emmitsburg. Fighting their way through the Catoctin mountains, they attacked the enemy at Hagerstown, and after defeating him, rapidly moved to the relief of the army train at Williamsport. In the fi
f the department, and under him in November, Colonel Witcher had a brigade consisting of his battalion, W. H. Payne's company and the two Thurmond battalions. The other western Virginia troops were mainly with Early in the Shenandoah valley. Maj.-Gen. John Echols was in command at Dublin, and participated in the defeat of the Federal raid into southwest Virginia in October. On August 4th, the brigades of Gen. Bradley Johnson (W. E. Jones' old brigade) and McCausland, returning from Chambersburg, Pa., attacked New Creek, and after a severe fight were repulsed with considerable loss. The Confederate command then proceeded to Moorefield, near where they were attacked in camp about daylight, August 7th, by Averell's cavalry, surprised and routed, losing 27 officers and 393 enlisted men as prisoners and 400 horses. On August 26th the Federals at Huttonsville, 70 strong, were captured by partisans. In the latter part of September, a brilliant raid was made by Lieut.-Col. V. A. Wi
nd went to Harper's Ferry, reporting to Col. T. J. Jackson. It was mustered in as Company G, Twenty-seventh Virginia infantry, of the Stonewall brigade. It served faithfully in that regiment until about May, 1863, when most of the survivors of the original company were transferred to the Thirty-sixth Virginia cavalry battalion, commanded by Maj. James Sweeney, of Wheeling. The battalion participated in the East Tennessee campaign as a part of Longstreet's command, was at the burning of Chambersburg, and in the rear guard after Gettysburg. Captain Shriver was succeeded in command, in the fall of 1862, by Robert McEldowney, previously orderly-sergeant. Captain McEldowney was the last remaining commissioned officer with the Twenty-seventh, on March 25, 1865, when the assault was made on Fort Stedman, and he was there wounded and disabled. Randolph county contributed the following companies to the Confederate service: Company A, Eighteenth Virginia cavalry; captains, Haymond Taylo
y, with headquarters at Staunton, and in June was ordered northward to report to General Ewell, with whom he cooper-ated in the defeat of Milroy at Winchester. He fought at Bunker Hill, and at Martinsburg led the advance guard of the army to Chambersburg and made a reconnoissance to Harrisburg. He was wounded on the second day of the Gettysburg battle, but his men, under the command of Colonel Ferguson, won approval in the cavalry fight of July 3d, and during the retreat to Virginia, especialthe daring commander actually penetrated into the town of Georgetown, but was compelled to retire before the Federal reinforcements. He returned with Early's army to the Shenandoah valley, and soon afterward was ordered to make a raid upon Chambersburg, Pa., and destroy it in retaliation for the destruction which attended the operations of the Federals in the valley. This duty he faithfully performed. In command of a brigade of Lomax's cavalry division he participated in the Valley campaign